search
WP_Query Object
(
    [query] => Array
        (
            [page] => 
            [pagename] => blog
        )

    [query_vars] => Array
        (
            [page] => 0
            [pagename] => blog
            [error] => 
            [m] => 
            [p] => 0
            [post_parent] => 
            [subpost] => 
            [subpost_id] => 
            [attachment] => 
            [attachment_id] => 0
            [name] => 
            [page_id] => 0
            [second] => 
            [minute] => 
            [hour] => 
            [day] => 0
            [monthnum] => 0
            [year] => 0
            [w] => 0
            [category_name] => 
            [tag] => 
            [cat] => 
            [tag_id] => 
            [author] => 
            [author_name] => 
            [feed] => 
            [tb] => 
            [paged] => 1
            [meta_key] => 
            [meta_value] => 
            [preview] => 
            [s] => 
            [sentence] => 
            [title] => 
            [fields] => 
            [menu_order] => 
            [embed] => 
            [category__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [category__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [category__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [post__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_name__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag_slug__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag_slug__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_parent__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_parent__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [author__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [author__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [posts_per_page] => 11
            [ignore_sticky_posts] => 
            [suppress_filters] => 
            [cache_results] => 1
            [update_post_term_cache] => 1
            [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1
            [update_post_meta_cache] => 1
            [post_type] => 
            [nopaging] => 
            [comments_per_page] => 5
            [no_found_rows] => 
            [order] => DESC
        )

    [tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object
        (
            [queries] => Array
                (
                )

            [relation] => AND
            [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [queried_terms] => Array
                (
                )

            [primary_table] => ph_posts
            [primary_id_column] => ID
        )

    [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object
        (
            [queries] => Array
                (
                )

            [relation] => 
            [meta_table] => 
            [meta_id_column] => 
            [primary_table] => 
            [primary_id_column] => 
            [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [clauses:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [has_or_relation:protected] => 
        )

    [date_query] => 
    [queried_object] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 6
            [post_author] => 1
            [post_date] => 2021-01-18 12:51:43
            [post_date_gmt] => 2021-01-18 12:51:43
            [post_content] => 
            [post_title] => Blog
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => closed
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => blog
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2021-01-18 12:51:43
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-01-18 12:51:43
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?page_id=6
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => page
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [queried_object_id] => 6
    [request] => 
					SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  ph_posts.ID
					FROM ph_posts 
					WHERE 1=1  AND ((ph_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (ph_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR ph_posts.post_status = 'acf-disabled')))
					
					ORDER BY ph_posts.post_date DESC
					LIMIT 0, 11
				
    [posts] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 11837
                    [post_author] => 1
                    [post_date] => 2022-11-23 19:13:46
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2022-11-23 19:13:46
                    [post_content] => 

The Metedeconk River flows through over 40 miles of New Jersey's woodlands, freshwater wetlands, forested wetlands, tidal wetlands, and densely developed areas before emptying into the Barnegat Bay. The river and its watershed provide drinking water from ground and surface water sources to about 100,000 homes in Ocean and Monmouth Counties.

A tributary to the North Branch of the Metedeconk River that flows directly through Ocean County Park in Lakewood, NJ. This tributary was deemed to have water quality impairments, including fecal coliform due to the Canada Goose population and high temperature due to the exposed stream channels, which lack a significant tree-canopy. The increasing amounts of impervious land cover associated with the continued urbanization of the Metedeconk River’s Watershed was also a primary cause of water quality impairments.

American Littoral Society (ALS) partnered with Princeton Hydro and local stakeholders to implement green infrastructure projects with the goal of remedying the fecal coliform and water temperature impairments in the Park's tributary as well as improving the overall health and water quality of the Metedeconk River, its surrounding watershed, and, ultimately, the greater Barnegat Bay.

 

Green Infrastructure Design & Implementation Project

The project team designed and implemented a stormwater treatment train, which combined multiple green infrastructure stormwater management best management practices (BMPs) that work in unison to decrease NPS pollutant loading to the Metedeconk River and increase ecological diversity in Ocean County Park.

The project, which was funded by a New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection 2014 319(h) Implementation Grant, included four primary BMPs in Ocean County Park: 1. Installation of two Filterra curb-side tree boxes; 2. Construction of a vegetated bioretention/biofiltration swale; 3. Creation of a section of living shoreline along the banks of Duck Pond; and 4. Installation of two floating wetland islands in Duck Pond.

 
 

Filterra curb-side tree boxes

 

Built at street level, the Filterra™ tree box is a pre-manufactured, in-ground concrete box filled with soil media and planted with a native, noninvasive tree or shrub. It is designed to collect stormwater, absorb nutrients, and treat water before it discharges into surrounding waterbodies.

For this project, two Filterra™ tree box units were installed in the parking lot to the north of Ocean County Park's swimming beach and each planted with serviceberry shrubs. The boxes serve to catch and treat stormwater runoff flowing from the parking lot.


Vegetated Bioswale

 

Unlike a traditional drainage basin that simply collects water, a vegetated bioswale uses native plants to reduce the volume of stormwater runoff, decrease total phosphorus loading, and prevent debris, sediment, and pollutants from flowing into the Metedeconk River and other surrounding waterbodies.

For this project, the team designed and implemented a .07-acre bioswale adjacent to the park's main parking lot. Installation of the vegetated bioswale began by removing existing vegetation, excavating the ground north of the parking lot, and then regrading it per the specifications on the plans. Once proper grading was established, the basin was planted with native species including Joe Pye Weed, Blue Mistflower, Jacob Cline Bee Balm, Orange Coneflower, and Wrinkleleaf Goldenrod.


Living Shoreline Along Duck Pond

[caption id="attachment_11850" align="aligncenter" width="767"] Photo by American Littoral Society[/caption]  

Living shorelines use a variety of native plants to filter runoff, create and improve habitat for aquatic animals, increase water quality, and protect the shoreline from erosion. Two sections of bulkhead along the North and South edges of Ocean County Park's Duck Pond were removed so that the bank could be sloped naturally into the pond and populated with vegetation. The design serves as an additional point of stormwater collection and filtration, significantly reducing the amount of water flowing into nearby paved parking areas.

The northern portion of the living shoreline encompasses 0.06 acres and spans 100 feet along the shore. The southern portion  encompasses 0.18 acres and spans 40 feet along the shore. The living shorelines were seeded and then planted with Green Bulrush, Helen’s Flower, Switchgrass, Blue Mistflower, New England Aster, Upright Sedge, and Little BlueStem.


Floating Wetland Islands in Duck Pond

A floating wetland island is made up of a plastic matrix that is planted with water-loving native vegetation. The matrix promotes the growth of a healthy microbial community. The biofilm that develops on the plants' roots and within the island matrix, contribute toward the uptake of nutrients within the waterbody thus improving water quality. Floating wetland islands are anticipated to remove an estimated 17.33 lbs of phosphorus and 566.67 lbs of nitrogen each year, as well as promote a balanced ecosystem through the promotion of “healthy” bacteria and plankton.

Two 250-square-foot floating wetland islands made of polyethylene terephthalate layers were populated with native wetland plants and installed in Duck Pond. The plant pockets were then filled with a biomix of soil and peat, and a variety of native plant species were planted on both islands, including: Swamp Milkweed, Upright Sedge, Common Boneset, Crimson Eyed Rosemallow, and Blue Flag Iris.


Volunteer Involvement & Community Education

Given the magnitude of the project and the high-profile nature of Barnegat Bay, community education and outreach was an essential element of the project and its long-term success. Throughout the course of the project, efforts were made to increase public understanding of the project and to encourage public input in the design of the green infrastructure BMPs and the living shoreline.

The education and outreach was a collaborative effort led by ALS, with support provided by the Ocean County Department of Parks and Recreation, Georgian Court University, Brick Municipal utilities Authority, NJDEP, and Princeton Hydro.

The team conducted public presentations and meetings, installed educational signs to accompany the water quality improvement techniques that were implemented, created a website dedicated to providing project details and updates, and invited local residents to participate in shoreline restoration and floating wetland island planting efforts.


Successful Outcome

Following the project, in-situ and discrete water quality monitoring was conducted in stream in order to assess the effectiveness of the above BMPs. The combined green infrastructure and living shoreline elements of this project set the stage for a much needed effort to reduce nonpoint source pollution loading and address waterfowl-related pathogen impacts to Ocean County Park’s lakes and the Metedeconk River. It also heightened public awareness of nonpoint source pollution and the benefits of green infrastructure measures in the abatement of water quality problems.

The project serves as a model for proper stormwater management and living shoreline creation throughout both the Metedeconk River and Barnegat Bay Watersheds.


To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s robust natural resource management and restoration services, click here. Click here to read about another stormwater management green infrastructure project recently completed in Thompson Park, the largest developed park in the New Jersey's Middlesex County park system.  

[post_title] => Designing & Implementing Green Infrastructure in the Metedeconk River Watershed [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => designing-implementing-green-infrastructure-in-the-metedeconk-river-watershed [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-12-02 15:20:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-12-02 15:20:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11837 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11893 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-11-22 17:32:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-11-22 17:32:43 [post_content] =>

This month, we’re celebrating the sixth anniversary of the Hughesville Dam Removal. The removal of the 18-foot-high, 150-foot-long dam not only marked a major milestone in restoring the Musconetcong River, it also led to the speedy return of the American shad (Alosa sapidissima), a species that had been absent from the area for 200+ years.

 

Project Background

The Hughesville Dam was constructed by John L. Riegel and the Warren Manufacturing Company in the late-1800s to provide water to power the former paper mill located in Hughesville. The dam, a 12-foot-high timber crib and rock fill dam, spanned the Musconetcong River from Holland Township, Hunterdon County to Pohatcong Township, Warren County. The structure was not in compliance with NJDEP Dam Safety Standards and was creating a blockage to catadromous and local fish passage.

Musconetcong Watershed Association hired Princeton Hydro to investigate, design, permit, and oversee the decommissioning of the Hughesville Dam, and conduct related river restoration work within the Musconetcong River. The Hughesville Dam was the fifth dam on the Musconetcong River designed for removal by Princeton Hydro.

As part of the dam removal project, Princeton Hydro completed a feasibility study in 2012 and initiated designs in 2014 to decommission the spillway and restore the impoundment. To assess potential sediment impacts, vibracoring was conducted and sediment analysis and quantification of the volume of impounded material was completed. Princeton Hydro worked with the NJDEP to assess the quality of sediment and determine its ultimate disposal.

[gallery columns="2" link="file" ids="1046,11896"]

As part of the design, the 21,000 cubic yards was proposed to be hydraulically dredged to adjacent existing on-site lagoons at this now defunct paper mill plant. The pre-existing and proposed hydraulics were assessed to understand impacts to an upstream bridge and downstream flood water surfaces following removal. Geomorphic assessments and utilization of nature-based restoration techniques were utilized to design a new river channel within the former impoundment.

Following the completion of design, applications were prepared for submission to NJDEP’s Land Use Regulation Program and Dam Safety Section, as well as the Hunterdon County Soil Conservation District (Warren County ceded jurisdiction to Hunterdon County). Princeton Hydro also applied for right-of-way permits to reinforce the foundation of an upstream county bridge as well as construct project access from a county road. Following the receipt of permits, Princeton Hydro assisted in the procurement of a contractor and provided construction administration services.

 

Bringing Down the Dam

On Thursday, Sept 8 2016, the project team made the first notches in the Dam. Sally Jewell, Secretary of the Interior during that time, toured the project site and held a press conference to commemorate the initial dam breach and celebrate the exciting news. Jewell called the project a “model for collaborative conservation.”

[caption id="attachment_5512" align="aligncenter" width="536"]Dam removal project partners and community members pose with Sally Jewell at the Hughesville Dam removal event on Sept. 8, 2016. Photo Credit: USFWS. Dam removal project partners and community members pose with Sally Jewell at the Hughesville Dam removal event on Sept. 8, 2016. Photo Credit: USFWS.[/caption]  

In addition to the Honorable Sally Jewell, NJDEP Commissioner Bob Martin, and U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, Philadelphia District Commander Lt. Colonel Michael Bliss, also participated in the press conference to discuss the importance of the Hughesville Dam removal and dam removal in general.

The entire dam removal took nearly three months, but you can watch the sped-up version here:

The project was supported by many partners and funded largely by the USFWS through the Department of the Interior (DOI) under the Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013.

 

Conservation Success

The removal of the obsolete Hughesville Dam marked another major milestone of restoring the Musconetcong River. The removal is part of a larger partner-based effort led by the Musconetcong Watershed Association to restore the 42-mile Musconetcong - a designated “Wild and Scenic River” – to a free-flowing state.

[caption id="attachment_11894" align="aligncenter" width="672"] Photos by Musconetcong Watershed Association[/caption]  

Removing the dam opened nearly six miles of the Musconetcong to migratory fish, such as American shad, that spend much of their lives in the ocean but return to rivers and their tributaries to spawn. The removal was completed in November 2016 and in the Spring of 2017, schools of American shad were observed above the dam, after 200+ years of absence. Shad are a benchmark species indicative of the overall ecological health and diversity of the waterway.

Other benefits of the dam removal include eliminating a public hazard due to the deteriorating nature of the dam; restoring the natural of floodplain functions and values of the area; restoring native stream substrate and habitat; and increasing river fishing and recreation opportunities.

To read more about the Musconetcong Watershed Association, click here. To read about another dam removal project along the Musconetcong River, click here. [post_title] => Celebrating the 6th Anniversary of Hughesville Dam Removal [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => celebrating-the-6th-anniversary-of-hughesville-dam-removal [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-11-30 23:45:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-11-30 23:45:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11893 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11902 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-11-21 15:32:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-11-21 15:32:19 [post_content] =>

The Princeton Hydro team is excited to participate in and sponsor a variety of events this Winter season, including conferences, educational webinars, fundraisers and community gatherings.

Check out the latest edition of our Events Spotlight:

 

November 29 - December 1: NY-NJ Harbor & Estuary Program Annual Conference

Are you a natural resource manager, scientist, conservation advocate, or policy leader? Join the NY-NJ Harbor & Estuary Program and the Hudson River Foundation for the 2022 Restoration Conference. This year’s conference, titled "Our Urban Shores," is focused on the restoration of urban shorelines and the efforts of community leaders and restoration practitioners who strive for effective and inclusive habitat enhancement. The program features two days of programming, including keynote speakers, educational workshops, restoration project case studies, and networking opportunities. Participants can join virtually on Nov 29th and 30th and in-person on Dec 1st at Liberty State Park. On Dec 1st before the conference sessions start, our Director of Restoration and Resilience, Christiana Pollack, CERP, CFM, GISP, will be leading a talk and walk on Restoring Liberty State Park with USACE and NJDEP.

Get more info and register.

December 2: New Jersey Waterworks Annual Conference

Jersey Water Works is pleased to present its Eighth Annual Conference, “Building a Water Sector Leadership Pipeline, Moving Money to Projects, Implementation, and Community Engagement.” The full-day, in-person event brings together state and local decision makers, practitioners, and stakeholders to collaborate, network and explore equitable and sustainable water solutions for New Jersey and beyond. Princeton Hydro is proud to sponsor this event, which is being held at The War Memorial in Trenton, NJ.

Get more info and register.

December 5: The Caren Franzini Capital City Award Celebration

Princeton Hydro is honored to sponsor the Greater Trenton's The Caren Franzini Capital City Award Celebration! Community members will come together to honor the legacy of Caren Franzini, former NJEDA CEO and one of the founders of Greater Trenton. The evening includes an awards ceremony, cocktails and conversations to reflect on Trenton’s past, reimagine its future, and make connections with some of the most influential leaders impacting the Capital City.

Get more info and register.

December 6: Barnegat Bay Stormwater Conference

Save Barnegat Bay invites local stakeholders, decision-makers, and on-the-ground operators to take part in the Charting a Course for Barnegat Bay conference. Participants should come prepared to discuss real solutions to local stormwater management in order to help restore, enhance, and protect Barnegat Bay. The invitation reads, "It is going to take everyone to manage the valuable resource of stormwater instead of wasting it and allowing it to pollute our estuary." The event will take place at B2 Bistro + Bar in Berkeley Township, NJ from 10am - 3pm.

Get more info and register.

December 7: NJ-AWRA Annual Meeting

NJ Section of American Water Resources Association is hosting its Annual Meeting in a virtual format. The meeting includes a presentation of the Homack Award, 2023 Board Elections, and a seminar on "The National Clean Water Utility of the Future Initiative." The seminar will be led by Andy Kricun, P.E., Managing Director of Moonshot Missions and a Senior Fellow at the U.S. Water Alliance. Established in 1964, the AWRA is a multidisciplinary association for information exchange, professional development and education about water resources and related issues.

Get more info and register.

December 8: Dam Removal Case Studies Webinar

As part of the Hudson River Watershed Alliance’s 2022-2023 monthly breakfast lecture series, the group is hosting a Dam Removal Case Studies webinar. Participants will learn about the vast benefits of dam removal removal, including reconnecting stream habitat, improving water quality, and reducing flooding hazards. And, they'll learn how private dam owners can obtain funding to remove their unwanted dams. The webinar will provide examples of completed dam removals, including the Maiden Lane dam, which Princeton Hydro was involved with.

Get more info and register.

January 30 - February 1: Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit

The 2023 Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit is back in person in 2023, in Atlantic City, NJ at Harrah's Resort and Casino! This year's meeting will feature keynote speakers, a forum on climate planning and adaptation strategies, networking events, and workshops. Princeton Hydro's Director of Restoration & Resilience Christiana Pollack CERP, CFM, GISP is leading one of the educational sessions. We hope to see you there!

Get more info and register.

February 10: Sixth Annual Watershed Conference

The theme of the 6th Annual Watershed Institute Watershed Conference is "Working Together to Address Flooding and Improve Water Quality." The one-day conference will feature an array of speakers who will cover topics, including MS4 requirements for municipalities in New Jersey; total maximum daily loads and pollution reduction; watershed improvement plans; stormwater utilities; regional approaches to stormwater management; and much more. Watershed members, the general public, environmental professionals, government officials, nonprofit organization professionals, and stakeholders are all invited to attend this exciting event!

Save the Date! Registration info coming soon.  

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT:

September 21: Science Seminar Series – What’s in Our Streams and Rivers? The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

The Stroud Water Research Center hosted a free webinar about “What’s in Our Streams and Rivers? The Good, the Bad, the Ugly.” For this webinar, which was part of a three-episode Science Seminar Series, which Princeton Hydro sponsored, Princeton Hydro presented on the ecological status of the Schuylkill River; shared the story of a yearlong community science project, which included a volunteer survey and scientific water quality assessment; and showcased the culminating interactive StoryMap. WATCH NOW.

September 21: FREE Stormwater Webinar

As part of its Technical Friday webinar series, The Watershed Institute hosted a "Retrofitting Stormwater Features (BMPs)" webinar, which was led by Princeton Hydro's Senior Technical Director of Engineering Dr. Clay Emerson, PE, CFM and Vice President Mark Gallagher. Participants learned how to identify the basins that could benefit the most from retrofits; which studies need to be done to determine whether a basin can or should be retrofitted; the steps to retrofitting a basin; and the permits and approvals required for retrofitting.

WATCH NOW.

 

Stay tuned for more events!

[post_title] => Winter Events Spotlight: Webinars, Conferences, & Celebrations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => winter-events-nov2022 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-11-23 18:43:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-11-23 18:43:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11902 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11482 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-11-01 20:00:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-11-01 20:00:26 [post_content] =>

The Lake Champlain Basin encompasses 8,000 square miles of mountains, forests, farmlands, and communities with 11 major tributaries that drain into Lake Champlain, ranging from 20 miles to 102 miles in stream length. The Vermont and New York portions of the Lake Champlain basin are home to about 500,000 people, with another 100,000 people in the Canadian portions of the watershed. At least 35% of the population relies on Lake Champlain for drinking water.

The Threat of Aquatic Invasive Species

The Lake Champlain basin is threatened by a large number of non-native aquatic invasive plant and animal species and pathogens. The Champlain Canal, a 60-mile canal in New York that connects the Hudson River to the south end of Lake Champlain has been identified by natural resources scientists and managers as a major pathway by which non-native and invasive species can invade Lake Champlain.

Aquatic invasive species that are present in the surrounding Great Lakes, Erie Canal, and Hudson River (e.g. hydrilla, round goby, Asian clam, quagga mussel, Asian carp, and snakehead) are a threat to Lake Champlain.

Once these harmful aquatic invasive species enter the lake and become established, they compete with and displace native species, severely impacting water quality, the lake ecosystem and the local economy. Infestations of these non-native invasive organisms cost citizens and governments in New York, Vermont, and Quebec millions of dollars each year to control and manage.

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) infestations reduce the recreational and economic health of communities in the Basin by choking waterways, blocking water intake pipes, outcompeting native species, lowering property values, encrusting historic shipwrecks, and ruining beaches. Additionally, they are known to decrease biodiversity and change the structure and function of ecosystems by displacing native species, transporting pathogens, and threatening fisheries, public health, and local or even regional economies.

Studying Viable Alternatives to Prevent the Transfer of Invasive Species

A study of the Champlain Canal was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, in partnership with the Lake Champlain Basin Program (LCBP), New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), and New York State Canal Corporation (NYSCC),  the non-Federal sponsor, New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC), HDR Inc, and Princeton Hydro. The main purpose of the "Champlain Canal Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Barrier Phase 1 Study" was to compare the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of different management alternatives that could best prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species between the Hudson and Champlain drainages via the Champlain Canal.

The primary focus of this study was located at the summit canal between locks C-8 and C-9, as this location is the natural point of separation for the watersheds. This is where (the summit) the Glens Falls Feeder Canal supplies Hudson River water to the height of the Champlain Canal to maintain water levels for navigability that flows south back to the Hudson, but also north and into the Champlain drainage.

The scope of the study included analyzing alternatives for a dispersal barrier on the Champlain Canal and evaluating options to prevent the spread of AIS, including fish, plants, plankton, invertebrates, and pathogens. The study examined potential physical and mechanical modifications to separate the two basins to prevent movement of aquatic nonnative and invasive species between the Hudson River and Lake Champlain. Physically and mechanically modifying the canal was evaluated to be the most effective at reducing the inter-basin transfer of invasives that might swim, float, or be entrained through the system, and it was found to be the most effective protection against all taxa of aquatic nonnative and invasive species.

Princeton Hydro’s main role was the initial administration of the project and development of a species inventory. This species inventory of the Champlain Canal included native and non-native aquatic species and potential aquatic invasive species that are threatening to become invasive to the Canal. Dispersal methods of the species were also evaluated to inform an Alternative Analysis. The overall study includes a Cost Benefit Analysis and Final Recommendations report of the Alternatives.

Plan Formulation and Evaluation of the Prevention Alternatives

The project team utilized a standard, three-step approach for developing alternatives: 1) gather general information about measures that may contribute to a solution to the problem, 2) narrow the list of measures through application of project-specific constraints, and 3) develop alternatives by combining measures that reduce or eliminate the cross-basin transfer of invasive species.

The alternative to construct a physical barrier across the canal was identified as the most effective approach to limiting the transfer of non-native AIS, and would address all taxa – plants, animals, plankton, viruses and pathogens. This alternative would include the installation and management of a large boat lift, a boat access ramp, a boat cleaning station, and repairs to the existing lock seals.

  [caption id="attachment_11496" align="aligncenter" width="801"] Truss Bridge over Glen Falls Feeder Canal at Lock 8 Way[/caption]  

At the Glens Falls Feeder Canal cleaning station and boat lift area, small and large boats would be cleaned prior to being placed back in the water on the other side, and the wash water would be captured and stored to be sent to a treatment plant. This alternative provides the most effective protection from AIS crossing between the Hudson River and Lake Champlain Watersheds, but it does remove the possibility of large commercial barges traveling the full length of the canal. A larger loading/offloading and cleaning facility would be required for commercial shipping vessels to be granted continued access along the canal.

The Champlain Canal Barrier Study (Phase I) Final Report and Appendices can be viewed in full on the New York District webpage.

Moving Forward Towards a Healthier Ecosystem

In a press release from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announcing the completion of the Phase I Study, Colonel Matthew Luzzatto, Commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District was quoted as saying, “This is an important milestone in moving forward towards a more healthy ecosystem for the Lake Champlain and Hudson River Watersheds. These two watersheds are vital to the lives and wellbeing of millions of residents of New York and Vermont. This study will have a positive impact on the overall economic and ecological health of the Lake Champlain Region, this is a win-win-win for all interested parties."

Following the completion of the Phase I portion of the study, the Phase II portion of the study will consist of detailed analyses of alternatives including engineering studies such as hydrologic evaluation for stream capacities / canal makeup water, geotechnical investigations at the location of the proposed concrete berm, topographic / utility survey as well as boundary / easement survey, vessel traffic studies through the canal, detailed cost estimates, and NEPA compliance. Once Phase II is complete and funding is appropriated, the Canal Barrier Project will be closer to construction.

[gallery link="none" columns="2" ids="10447,11497"]  

Stay tuned for updates!

[post_title] => Preventing the Transfer of Invasive Species via the Champlain Canal [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => champlain-canal-invasive-species-barrier [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-11-04 21:17:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-11-04 21:17:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11482 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11552 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-10-31 13:03:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-10-31 13:03:10 [post_content] =>

Welcome to the latest edition of our Client Spotlight series, which provides an inside look at our collaboration and accomplishments with a specific client.

For this Client Spotlight, we spoke with Tim Fenchel, Deputy Director of Schuylkill River Greenways National Heritage Area (SRG). The mission of SRG is to connect residents, visitors, and communities to the Schuylkill River and the Schuylkill River Trail by serving as a catalyst for civic engagement and economic development in order to foster stewardship of the watershed and its heritage. The boundaries of the Heritage Area cover the Schuylkill River watershed in Schuylkill, Berks, Chester, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties.

Let's dive in!

1. Tell us a little about SRG and what makes it unique?

[embed]https://youtu.be/vhdJlEUKyOg[/embed]

2. What does SRG value?

We value our heritage and the deeply-rooted culture of this region. We also look ahead to how we can continue to engage our communities with that heritage and create future generations of stewards for the Schuylkill River and Schuylkill River Trail.

We value vibrant and revitalized communities, and it’s rewarding to see how SRG has contributed to sustainable revitalization of river-town communities, including Phoenixville, Manayunk, and Pottstown. We really value helping to maintain a strong connection between the river and its surrounding neighborhoods. By enabling and encouraging communities to enjoy the river and trail, we create lifelong stewards of these important resources.

Another core value is making outdoor recreation accessible for everyone. The trail is a public recreational resource that anyone can enjoy, and we really try to promote it as a means for health and wellness, all kinds of recreation experiences, family-friendly outings, arts and culture, and much more.

Collaboration is also very valuable to SRG. Every single project and program that we do, we do it in partnership with at least one other organization if not multiple other organizations. The Schuylkill River Water Quality project, which we’ll talk more about today, is a great example of that.


3. What is your primary role within SRG?

As Deputy Director, I get to be involved in just about everything that we do here. I assist with the day-to-day operations of the organization; I pitch in with trail issues when they arise; I’m involved, in some way shape or form, with our various community events throughout the year; and I also have several projects and programs that I personally oversee. The Schuylkill River Water Quality project is one, which we'll discuss in more detail shortly.

Another unique project I oversee is the Schuylkill River Restoration Fund. Essentially, SRG receives funding from both private and public entities, and we then regrant those funds to local government agencies, nonprofits, and community organizations to implement on-the-ground projects for the improvement of water quality throughout the Schuylkill River Watershed. The grants focus on three major sources of pollution: stormwater run-off, agricultural pollution, and abandoned mine drainage.

There is a lot of variety in my role here, which I really enjoy.


4. What excites you about going to work every day?

[embed]https://youtu.be/LAcyIU4HvYQ[/embed]

5. Can you talk a little bit about the partnership between SRG and Princeton Hydro, and the Schuylkill River Water Quality project?

An important aspect of our mission is to connect communities to the Schuylkill River through recreational and educational activities. To fully achieve the Schuylkill River’s potential, we must help the public understand the current health status and what they can do to continue to improve its quality for this generation and generations to come. In 2019, we received a grant from the William Penn Foundation to fund the Schuylkill River Water Quality project, which aimed to document the current ecological status and health of the river, and engage and educate a diverse set of river users and residents.

Through an RFP process, we selected Princeton Hydro as one of the main project advisors. From the start, we hit it off with Michael Hartshorne, Director of Aquatics, and Dana Patterson, Director of Marketing & Communications. The strength of what they brought as a team and their scientific water quality and engagement expertise impressed us from the start and it really carried on throughout the entirety of the project. We had a truly tremendous team of partners, including Berks Nature, Bartram’s Garden, The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, and Stroud Water Research Center.

The project, which focused on the main stem of the river from Reading to Southwest Philadelphia, included four key components:

  1. User Opinion and Perceptions Survey
  2. Community Science Visual Assessment Trash Survey
  3. Water Quality Monitoring
  4. Educational Outreach

The yearlong data collection and community science initiative culminated with the launch of  an interactive ArcGIS StoryMap webpage that reveals the local perceptions of the Schuylkill River and aims to connect residents with and encourage engagement with this special resource.

[embed]https://youtu.be/5QHMQwGvU38[/embed] Click here to explore the interactive ArcGIS StoryMap:

6. Do you have a favorite or most memorable moment from the project?

[embed]https://youtu.be/l6PzseNpdNI[/embed]

7. The Schuylkill River StoryMap is part of a larger project to foster positive perceptions of the Schuylkill River. Can you talk a little more about your goals moving forward and how you plan to use the StoryMap?

[embed]https://youtu.be/eCKyofuKCcE[/embed]

8. What are some of SRG’s initiatives and upcoming activities that you’d like to share?

We have so many wonderful events throughout the year that provide an opportunity for community members to learn about and engage with the Schuylkill River and the Trail.

We just held the Ride for the River outing, which is a one-day bike ride and fundraising event. The ride began at the Pottstown River Front Park and followed about 20-miles of the Schuylkill River Trail to Reading. It’s always a ton of fun.

Every June we have our Annual Schuylkill River Sojourn, which consists of a 7-day, 112-mile guided canoe/kayak trip on the Schuylkill River that begins in rural Schuylkill Haven and ends in Philadelphia. The event combines kayaking/canoeing, camping, education, and games into one exciting adventure.

In November, we're hosting our 18th annual “Scenes of the Schuylkill” Art Show. Throughout the year, we host several free educational programs, do guided tours at locations within the Heritage Area, and so much more.

Click here to learn more about SRG’s Programs and Events.

 

A big thanks to Tim and SRG for taking part in our Client Spotlight Series!

Schuylkill River Greenways relies on help from volunteers, who provide valued assistance with trail maintenance, special events, environmental education, water quality monitoring and more. To learn more about how to get involved, visit SRG's volunteer portal for a full rundown of opportunities.

  Click below to read the previous edition of our Client Spotlight Series featuring Seatuck Environmental Association Conservation Policy Advocate Emily Hall: [visual-link-preview encoded="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"] [post_title] => Client Spotlight: Schuylkill River Greenways National Heritage Area [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => client-spotlight-schuylkill-river-greenways [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-10-31 17:16:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-10-31 17:16:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11552 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11554 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-10-29 16:06:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-10-29 16:06:00 [post_content] =>

Ecological restoration work is underway in the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which is celebrated as America's First Urban Refuge. Friends of Heinz Refuge hired Princeton Hydro and teammates Enviroscapes and Merestone Consultants to provide engineering design, environmental compliance, engineering oversight, and construction implementation to enhance and restore aquatic, wetland, and riparian habitats and adjacent uplands within the Turkey Foot area of the Refuge.

About the Refuge

The Turkey Foot project area is an approximately 7.5-acre site within the greater 1,200-acre John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge, which is located within the City of Philadelphia and neighboring Tinicum Township in Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, about one-half mile north of Philadelphia International Airport.

The Refuge protects approximately 200 acres of the last remaining freshwater tidal marsh in Pennsylvania and represents an important migratory stopover along the Atlantic Flyway, a major north-south flyway for migratory birds in North America. It also provides protected breeding habitat for State-listed threatened and endangered species, as well as many neotropical migrants, such as the American Bittern, Least Bittern, Black-crowned Night-heron, King Rail, Great Egret, Yellow-crowned Night-heron, and Sedge Wren.

[caption id="attachment_11775" align="aligncenter" width="732"] Photo of a Least Bittern taken in the Refuge by Princeton Hydro Vice President Mark Gallagher[/caption]  

The Refuge was established for the purposes of preserving, restoring, and developing the natural area known as Tinicum Marsh, as well as to provide an environmental education center for its visitors. The Refuge contains a variety of ecosystems unique in Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia metropolitan area, including tidal and non-tidal freshwater marshes, freshwater tidal creeks, open impoundment waters, coastal plain forests, and early successional grasslands. Although many of the Refuge’s ecosystems have been degraded, damaged, or, in some cases, destroyed as a result of numerous historic impacts dating back to the mid-17th century, many of these impacted ecosystems have the potential to be restored or enhanced through various management and restoration efforts.

 

Turkey Foot Ecological Restoration Project

The Turkey Foot project area is an example of one of the historically impacted ecosystems at the Refuge with tremendous opportunity for ecological restoration. The Friends of Heinz Refuge and the project team are working to restore and enhance the aquatic habitats, wetlands, riparian buffers, and adjacent uplands within the project area.

The approach for the restoration project focuses on creating approximately four acres of contiguous wetland habitat bordered by a functional riparian buffer. The design includes the creation of three habitat zones: intertidal marsh, high marsh, and upland grassland.

[caption id="attachment_11774" align="aligncenter" width="1072"] Illustration of the Turkey Foot Conceptual Design identifying the three proposed habitat areas and the project area.
Conceptual Design created by Princeton Hydro.[/caption]  

Incorporating the three elements into the landscape will help to establish foraging, breeding, and nesting habitat for critical wildlife species, including Eastern Black Rail, a threatened species listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.

The project work also includes a robust invasive species management plan, aimed at removing close to 100% of the invasive species, supported by an adaptive management monitoring program that will guide the development of the restored site towards the ultimate goal of establishing a diverse and productive coastal ecosystem within the Turkey Foot project area.

The upland slopes of the high marsh were seeded earlier this year, which will help to establish a grassland dominated by native warm season grasses. Native shrubs and flowering plants were also installed, including little bluestem, switchgrass, Virginia wild rye, asters, goldenrods, and bergamot. And, coastal panic grass was seeded, which is another Pennsylvania-listed endangered species, and, once grown-in, will provide suitable stopover foraging and cover for migratory land birds and pollinators.

The team also completed site grading to increase tidal flushing within the Turkey Foot’s two ponds, create intertidal and high marsh wetlands, prevent stagnant water and nutrient accumulation in bottom sediments, and reduce the reestablishment of invasive species. The bottom of the existing ponds were raised to elevations that support the establishment of intertidal marsh. The pond banks were then regraded to create the appropriate elevations for freshwater intertidal marsh and high marsh. Additionally, the tidally influenced connection points between the two ponds and the linear channel were enlarged.

Refuge Manager Lamar Gore recently visited the Turkey Foot project site and interviewed Deputy Refuge Manager, Mariana Bergerson, and Princeton Hydro Director of Restoration and Resilience, Christiana Pollack, about the progress made thus far and what's to come. Watch now:

 

Upcoming Restoration Activities

In Spring of 2023, the team will install a wide variety of native wetland plant species plugs and continue its work to restore the riparian buffer habitats within the Turkey Foot project area. The high marsh will be planted with a mix of native coastal plain wetland species, including fine-stemmed emergent plants, primarily rushes and grasses, with high stem densities and dense canopy cover, using species such as chairmaker's bulrush, river bulrush, blue flag, and rice cutgrass. The installation of river bulrush, a Pennsylvania-listed rare species, will provide beneficial wildlife habitat and serve to expand the range of this species in Pennsylvania. Additionally, restoring the high marsh will create the foundation for establishing Black Rail habitat and giving the threatened species protection from predators and opportunities to glean insects and other invertebrates from the ground and water.

The restoration and enhancement of riparian buffer habitats will reduce sedimentation and lower pond temperatures, improving water quality for native fish and invertebrates. Riparian buffers also filter nutrients in runoff and deter eutrophication of the ponds, and provide high quality food sources for native and migratory species, unlike the invasive species which provide low nutrient value foods.

[gallery link="none" ids="11773,11772,11770"]  

Please stay tuned to our blog for more project updates once the plantings have been completed in the Spring, as well as before and after photos once the plants are established. To read more about Princeton Hydro's robust natural resource management and restoration services, click here.

[post_title] => Ecological Restoration in John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => ecological-restoration-in-john-heinz-national-wildlife-refuge [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-11-01 15:35:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-11-01 15:35:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11554 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11799 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-10-28 14:27:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-10-28 14:27:29 [post_content] =>

Our staff is composed of highly-qualified scientists, engineers, and administrative professionals who are passionate about our mission. Today, we’re excited to introduce the two newest members of the Princeton Hydro team!

Please join us in welcoming them:

Jamie Feinstein, RLA Project Manager, River Restoration & Resilience; Landscape Architect

Jamie is a licensed professional Landscape Architect with over 15 years of experience in landscape architecture, environmental design, construction management and general contracting in both the public and private sectors and across a variety of project scales. Her multifaceted background includes managing a green infrastructure design and construction program, building urban parkland in lower Manhattan, ecosystem restoration, and vertical building construction projects. She has written technical specifications and bid packages, provided construction project management and oversight as well as performed environmental data monitoring. Jamie has also led community and municipal design projects through complex approvals processes and connected with local education partners to perform ongoing ecological restoration and stewardship work.

During her time at New York City Parks, she contributed to a city-wide, cross-jurisdictional green infrastructure program to improve water quality and reduce runoff in priority watersheds within the five boroughs. While working for New York Restoration Project, Jamie led the capital construction program where she worked with neighborhoods to enhance community gardens for sustainability and inclusivity as well as leading a shoreline stabilization and ecological restoration along the Harlem River. Additionally, she has managed various municipal projects in New York, re-envisioning floodplain parks along the Hudson River as well as multiple residential projects that have focused on native landscapes and gardens while managing stringent regulatory compliance parameters. Jamie has also served as a construction project manager for a general contractor, running new construction, restoration and fit-outs for clients in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, giving her insight into how vertical construction and landscape coexist.

In her free time, Jamie likes to snuggle with her dog, go rock climbing, read, create perfectly balanced garden compost and make bad jokes.


Nicole Petrillo Administrative Assistant

Nicole has over 20 years of experience in customer service and administration in a variety of fields including environmental law and insurance. Most recently, she served as an Administrative Assistant at an insurance firm where she maintained the office space, greeted visitors, coordinated internal events, and assisted various departments with special projects. Prior to that role, she served as a Legal Secretary for a prominent environmental law firm in New Jersey where she played a crucial role in the everyday workings of the law office and supported the lawyers and paralegals. Nicole is a hard-working, detail-oriented team member who has proven to be resourceful at a moment’s notice. Her excellent communication and people skills makes her the perfect person to support our Trenton Office as well as assist our Executive Team on a variety of tasks and internal projects.

In her free time, Nicole enjoys walking in her neighborhood, gardening, playing with her dog, and spending time with her family.

 

[post_title] => Employee Spotlight: Announcing Two New Team Members [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => employee-spotlight-announcing-two-new-team-members [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-11-01 15:36:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-11-01 15:36:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11799 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11717 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-10-26 17:09:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-10-26 17:09:16 [post_content] =>

Princeton Hydro led a stormwater management webinar during which participants learned about the purpose, management, and functionality of stormwater basins, and how to get involved in addressing stormwater management issues in their own communities. Dr. Clay Emerson, P.E., CFM and Mark Gallagher, the webinar instructors, provided examples of basins that could benefit most from a retrofit and step-by-step instructions on how to revitalize older basins to meet new stormwater standards and more effectively manage runoff.

  [embed]https://youtu.be/WRnSjGrHrog[/embed]  

The workshop, hosted by The Watershed Institute, is part of the Watershed Wednesdays webinar series, which explores a variety of topics related to protecting and improving water quality. The Watershed Institute, established in 1949, is a nonprofit organization located in Central New Jersey that promotes and advocates conservation and restoration of natural habitats, collects data on environmental conditions in its watersheds, and provides environmental education through numerous programs. To learn more about The Watershed Institute and other upcoming adult-education events, click here.

At Princeton Hydro, we are experts in stormwater management; we recognize the numerous benefits of green infrastructure; and we’ve been incorporating green infrastructure into our engineering designs since before the term was regularly used in the stormwater lexicon. Click here to read about the on-call stormwater services and ongoing residential, commercial, and professional redevelopment projects we’re working on in Tredeffryin Township, Pennsylvania.

[post_title] => WATCH: Understanding Stormwater Basins Near You [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => watch-understanding-stormwater-basins-near-you [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-10-26 17:45:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-10-26 17:45:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11717 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11651 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-10-03 06:45:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-10-03 06:45:04 [post_content] => [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekVqRMI5ncc[/embed]

For episode three of Stroud Water Research Center's 2022 Science Seminar Series, Michael Hartshorne, Director of Aquatics at Princeton Hydro (and former Stroud Center intern), gave a presentation about the ecological status of the Schuylkill River and shared the story of a yearlong community science project that included a volunteer survey and scientific water quality assessment. Stroud Center's Science Seminar lecture series, which provides an opportunity for the public to learn more about the issues that matter to them, has been running for over a decade. It also gives the public access to some of the world’s leading freshwater scientists and educators and the chance to learn how watershed science and education are tackling water-related challenges.

As described in Michael's presentation, the project, which included four phases, was implemented through a partnership between the Schuylkill River Greenways, Berks Nature, Bartram’s Garden, The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, Stroud Center, and Princeton Hydro.

First, to understand local perceptions of the river, investigators conducted a community survey of more than 300 residents from Berks, Chester, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties. Despite a majority of respondents reporting that they care about the river, many also reported concerns about trash and litter and whether the river is clean and safe enough for activities like swimming and fishing. This insight was used to drive the priorities for the in-depth water quality monitoring assessment and inspired the launch of a new Community Science trash monitoring program.

In June, the group launched an interactive ArcGIS StoryMap webpage that reveals the local perceptions of the Schuylkill River and aims to connect residents and communities with the Schuylkill River and encourage engagement with this special resource.

[post_title] => WATCH: Webinar on Understanding the Ecological Status of the Schuylkill River [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => watch-stroud-center-webinar [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-10-04 13:05:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-10-04 13:05:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11651 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11506 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-09-27 19:04:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-09-27 19:04:51 [post_content] =>

The Lion’s Gate Park and Urban Wetland Floodplain Creation Project has been chosen as a winner of the New Jersey Future “Smart Growth Awards” for 2022. The project transformed a densely developed, flood-prone, industrial site into a thriving public active recreation park with 4.2 acres of wetlands.

As stated in the New Jersey Future award announcement, “The park is representative of smart growth values, with walkable trails in the middle of a residential area, a regenerated protected wetland which helps to mitigate flooding from storms like Hurricane Ida, and mixed-use opportunities for recreation. The dual roles of Lion Gate Park as both a source of resilience and recreation demonstrate a model of land use and planning that values the accessibility of public spaces while acknowledging and addressing the urgent need to adapt to the growing impacts of climate change in New Jersey.”

The restoration project site is located in Bloomfield Township and includes 1,360 feet along the east bank of the Third River and 3,040 feet along the banks of the Spring Brook. These waterways are freshwater tributaries of the Passaic River and share a history of flooding above the site’s 100-year floodplain. The Third River, like many urban streams, tends to be the victim of excessive volume and is subjected to erosion and chronic, uncontrolled flooding.

By removing a little over four acres of upland historic fill in this density developed area and restoring the natural floodplain connection, we significantly improved the land’s ecological value; enhanced the aquatic and wildlife habitat; increased flood storage capacity for urban stormwater runoff; replaced invasive plant species with thriving native wetland and riparian plant communities; and provided outdoor recreation accessibility to Bloomfield Township.

  [gallery columns="2" link="none" ids="4704,9172"]  

The Lion Gate Park project is the culmination of nearly two decades of collaborative work. The primary project team includes the Township of Bloomfield, NY/NJ Baykeeper, Bloomfield Third River Association, CME Associates, PPD Design, GK+A Architects, Enviroscapes, Strauss and Associates/Planners, and Princeton Hydro. The project recieved $1.76 million in funding from the New Jersey Freshwater Wetlands Mitigation Council and another several million dollars from NJDEP’s Office of Natural Resource Restoration.

Princeton Hydro served as the ecological engineer to Bloomfield Township. Our scientists and engineers assisted in obtaining grants, collected background ecological data through field sampling and surveying, created a water budget, completed all necessary permitting, designed both the conceptual and final restoration plans, and conducted construction oversight throughout the project. Enviroscapes and Princeton Hydro are currently monitoring the site on behalf of the Township.

  [gallery link="none" columns="2" ids="4710,9319"]  

“Local residents are already benefiting from this floodplain creation project. During Tropical Storm Ida, the area held significant flood waters,” said Mark Gallagher, Vice President of Princeton Hydro. “This restoration project really exemplifies how a diverse group of public and private entities can work together to prioritize urban and underserved areas to mitigate flooding and create new open space. We’re honored to be recognized by NJ Future and selected as a winner of this important award.”

  [gallery link="none" columns="2" ids="9318,9294"]  

Since 2002, New Jersey Future has honored smart planning and redevelopment in New Jersey through its "Smart Growth Awards." The projects and plans chosen each year represent some of the best examples of sustainable growth and redevelopment in the state. For a complete list of 2022 Award Winners, click here. For more info on New Jersey Future, click here.

To learn more about the Bloomfield restoration project and see drone images of it all coming together, click below: [visual-link-preview encoded="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"] [post_title] => Bloomfield's Lion’s Gate Park Restoration Wins 2022 Smart Growth Award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => lion-gate-park-wins-smart-growth-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-11-07 16:41:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-11-07 16:41:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11506 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11261 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-09-08 02:22:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-09-08 02:22:39 [post_content] =>

This Fall, Princeton Hydro team is proud to be participating in and sponsoring education courses, conferences, fundraisers and community gatherings. In this edition of our Events Spotlight, we provide an overview of all the latest happenings and information on how to get involved:

 

September 17: 4th Annual Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference

The Northwest New Jersey partners of the four-state Delaware River Watershed Initiative is hosting its 4th Annual Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference. The focus of the Conference is promoting a compatible tourism economy that leverages the regions incredible natural resources. Princeton Hydro is proud to sponsor this event, which aims to give participants a better understanding of the relationship between our region’s water and other natural resources and our region’s quality of life, including enhanced water quality, developing a vibrant tourism sector economy, expanding recreational opportunities, and appreciating the region’s scenic values. Get more info and register.

September 17: New Jersey Coalition of Lake Associations Fall Meeting

NJCOLA, a coalition of 83-member lake associations in Northern New Jersey, is hosting its Fall Meeting on September 17 from 9 - Noon at the Lake Mohawk Country Club. Princeton Hydro Senior Project Manager and North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Board of Directors President Christopher L. Mikolajczyk, CLM will be there to present to the group and provide an update from NALMS on funding for in-lake management programs. The Fall Meeting will also include presentations from Culver Lake and Lake Mohawk representatives, briefings from NJCOLA officers, Round Table discussions, and a light breakfast. Get more info.

September 17: Trenton River Days

Join us for the 4th annual Trenton River Days, a free event that celebrates the history, culture, and recreational benefits of the Delaware River. From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 17, local families and community members are invited to South Riverwalk Park near the Trenton Thunder Stadium to enjoy the festivities. We're bringing our airboat, so come hang out at our table and check out our fun equipment. More info.

September 18 - 22: Dam Safety National Conference

The Association of State Dam Safety Officials' National Dam Safety conference brings together 1,000 professionals from across the country to discuss the latest in dam and levee safety. The four-day event, being held in Baltimore, MD, includes an exhibitor hall, lightening talks, and variety of presentations on topics ranging from dam incident management to levee safety incidents to hi-tech hydrology. Members from the Princeton Hydro team are attending and looking forward to seeing you there! Get more info and register.

September 21: FREE Stormwater Webinar

As part of its Technical Friday webinar series, The Watershed Institute is hosting a "Retrofitting Stormwater Features (BMPs)" webinar on September 21 from 6 - 7:15 p.m. EST. The webinar is being led by Princeton Hydro's Senior Technical Director of Engineering Dr. Clay Emerson, PE, CFM and Vice President Mark Gallagher. Participants will learn how to identify the basins that could benefit the most from retrofits; which studies need to be done to determine whether a basin can or should be retrofitted; the steps to retrofitting a basin; and the permits and approvals required for retrofitting. The webinar, which is free and being held virtually on Zoom, will also include a Q&A session. Get more info and register.

September 21: Science Seminar Series - What’s in Our Streams and Rivers? The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

Join the Stroud Water Research Center for a free webinar about "What's in Our Streams and Rivers? The Good, the Bad, the Ugly." The free webinar is part of a three-episode Science Seminar Series, which Princeton Hydro sponsored. For episode three, Michael Hartshorne, Director of Aquatics at Princeton Hydro, will share the details of the yearlong Schuylkill River community science project, which was just recently completed, and share the culminating interactive ArcGIS StoryMap, which documents the ecological status and local perceptions of the river. Get more info and register.

October 1: Watershed FEST

Are you looking for a fun excuse to get outside and celebrate the beautiful lakes, rivers, and streams all around us? Join the Watershed Institute for its 47th Annual Watershed FEST! Princeton Hydro is proud to sponsor this year's FEST, which is titled "Pathways and Waterways." It begins at 6:30 p.m. on the Watershed Center grounds with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, followed by dinner, live music, dessert and dancing. FEST is The Watershed Institute’s largest fundraising event of the year and supports its mission of keeping water clean, safe and healthy.

Get more info and register.

October 5: SAME Philadelphia Post Small Business Conference 2022

This year’s SAME Philadelphia Post Small Business Conference includes presentations, interactive breakout sessions, networking sessions, panel discussions, and a small-business exhibitor hall. Princeton Hydro, one of the event sponsors and exhibitors, joined SAME as a sustaining member in 2018. The mission of SAME is to build leaders and lead collaboration among government and industry to develop multidisciplinary solutions to national security infrastructure challenges. Get more info and register.

October 5: NJ Invasive Species Strike Team Professional Conference

Presented by the Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space and hosted by Duke Farms, Princeton Hydro is proud to sponsor the 14th Annual New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team Conference. The Strike Team is dedicated to protecting our natural lands from future damage through coordinated strategic invasive species management involving a team of partners and volunteers. The group's focus is eliminating threats posed by newly emerging invasive species before they become widespread pests and protecting our most pristine lands and rare species habitats. More event info and registration details are coming soon! Register here.

October 6 & 7: Rutgers Professional Education Course on Urban Stormwater Management

This NEW "Urban Stormwater Management: Building Resilient Communities" online course aims to demonstrate how green infrastructure stormwater management techniques are used in urban settings to increase community resilience to flooding, climate change, and other stormwater-linked environmental and social impacts. The course brings together leaders in the field of urban stormwater management, including Princeton Hydro's Mark Gallagher, Vice President, and Christiana Pollack, CFM, GISP, Director of Restoration and Resilience, who will share with course attendees how green infrastructure is being applied in urban settings through case study demonstrations. Dr. Stephen Souza, a founding principal of Princeton Hydro and owner of Clean Water Consulting, is the lead instructor for the course. Get more info and register.

OCTOBER 11: Workshop on Algal Bloom Mitigation and Algal Biotechnology for Sustainable New Jersey

Hosted by NJIT, this regional workshop aims to promote knowledge exchange and collaboration in the fields of algal bloom mitigation and algal biotechnology. The workshop will provide a forum for academic faculty, industrial practitioners and experts, federal and state agencies to share and explore emerging trends and new technologies in HAB prevention, algal research and algal biotechnology. The workshop includes keynote speakers, educational demonstrations, and student poster sessions along with a lunch buffet, networking opportunities, and offers participants 1 PDH or CEU from AWWA. Dr. Fred Lubnow, a HAB expert and Senior Technical Director of Ecological Services for Princeton Hydro, is leading a education session during the event, which is being held in-person at the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority (NJSEA) in Lyndhurst. Get more info and register.

OCTOBER 12: SAME MEGA Maryland Small Business Conference

The MEGA Maryland conference, being held at Martin's West in Baltimore, gives small and minority businesses in the architecture, engineering and construction industries the opportunity to come together with federal agencies in order to showcase best practices and highlight future opportunities to work in the federal market. Nearly 500 professionals throughout the Mid-Atlantic region are expected to attend this year’s MEGA Maryland, which includes 75+ speakers and a large exhibitor hall. Princeton Hydro is exhibiting. We hope you'll come by the booth to say "hello" to our team! This year's event also includes educational and MD PE Ethics Training webinars on the three days leading up to the conference: October 10, 11 & 14. Links for the webinars will be sent to all conference attendees 24 hours in advance of the scheduled session Get more info and register.

OCTOBER 12 & 13: Stormwater Symposium

Hosted by the Villanova Center for Resilient Water Systems, home of the Villanova Urban Stormwater Partnership, this year’s Stormwater Symposium is themed "Infrastructure. Resilience. Equity." Over the course of the two-day program, participants will learn about innovations in green stormwater infrastructure from a diverse group of professionals representing the academic, nonprofit, government and industry sectors. In addition to keynote presentations, technical sessions and moderated panel discussions, the Symposium will feature 50 abstracts from the stormwater community, including one from Princeton Hydro's Senior Technical Director of Engineering Dr. Clay Emerson, PE, CFM who is giving a presentation titled, "I don't remember it raining like this before; stormwater design and regulatory context." The symposium also offers networking opportunities like the Wine & Cheese Social. Get more info and register.

October 14: Association of New Jersey Environmental Commissions' 2022 Environmental Congress

We are thrilled to support ANJEC’s 49th Annual Environmental Congress. Each day includes a variety of workshop sessions on topics like stormwater management, environmental justice advancement in New Jersey, and local climate action. ANJEC, a non-profit organization, helps New Jersey environmental commissions, individuals, local and state agencies achieve responsible and sustainable use of New Jersey’s natural resources and protection of environmental health. Princeton Hydro, a business member of the ANJEC, is exhibiting during the event. Get more info and register.

October 20: NJ-Philadelphia Post SAME and JBMDL Small Business Roundtable Industry Day

The Joint Base MDL Small Business Roundtable and the New Jersey and Philadelphia Posts have partnered together to host this in-person Small Business event. The Industry Day includes presentations from  government officials, industry experts, and agency members including U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, JBMDL, GSA, and Congressman Andy Kim. A full breakfast and lunch buffet will be served. SAME aims to provide leaders from the A/E/C, environmental, and facility management industries the opportunity to come together with federal agencies in order to showcase best practices and highlight future opportunities for small businesses to work in the federal market. Princeton Hydro is exhibiting at the event. Learn more & register.

October 23 - 28: 11th U.S. Symposium on Harmful Algal Blooms

The symposium, which is themed "Science to Support Solutions from Shore to Shore," is being led by the NEIWPCC, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and U.S. Geological Survey with support from the U.S. National Office for Harmful Algal Blooms at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Presentations and education sessions will center around the impact of HABs on freshwater and marine systems, and take a deep dive into the prevalence of HABs as a national environmental challenge and solutions to overcoming the challenge. Princeton Hydro's Senior Technical Director of Ecological Services and HABs Expert Dr. Fred Lubnow is presenting on "Using Phycocyanin Meters to Monitor HABs and the Development of HAB Management Plans." Get more info and register.

October 25 - 27: New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management Annual Conference

NJAFM is hosting its 15th Annual Conference and Exhibition in Atlantic City, NJ. Participants will attend meetings and seminars covering topics, including hazard mitigation, flood insurance, flood modeling, stormwater management, construction standards and more. Princeton Hydro is exhibiting at the conference. This year's keynote speaker is Dr. Robert S. Young, Director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines. He will discuss New Jersey post-Sandy and the need for realistic planning and adaptation to maintain the coastal economy going forward. Get more info and register.

November 3 & 4: Delaware River Watershed Forum

The 10th Annual Delaware River Watershed Forum, titled "A Decade on the Delaware: A Reflection on Yesterday, a Vision for Tomorrow," brings together organizations and individuals spanning the four watershed states of PA, NY, NJ, and DE. The Forum, which is being hosted in-person at the Logan Hotel in Philadelphia,  features a mix of engaging speakers, facilitated discussions, field trips, and a 10th Anniversary Celebration Reception. Workshops will focus on topics like engaging communities around water quality protection, environmental policy, and climate change.  Princeton Hydro is sponsoring the Forum and looking forward to attending! Get more info and register.

November 10: New Jersey Future's Award Celebration

New Jersey Future’s Smart Growth Awards recognize the very best in planning, development, and redevelopment in the Garden State. To celebrate the 2022 award winners, New Jersey Future is hosting a virtual celebration on the interactive event platform Accelevents. Princeton Hydro is proud to sponsor this premier fundraising event and honored to be recognized with a 2022 Smart Growth Award for the Lion Gate Park and Urban Wetland Floodplain Creation Project. Advance registration is required. Get more info and register.

November 11 - 14: Conference on Landscape Architecture

The American Society of Landscape Architects' 2022 Conference will take place in San Francisco, CA! The conference is considered the largest gathering of landscape architects and allied professionals in the world, who will all come together to learn, celebrate, build relationships, and strengthen the bonds of the professional landscape architect community. The 4-day event includes field sessions, 120+ educational workshops, an expo hall with 300+ exhibitors, a block party, and so much more! Princeton Hydro Landscape Architect Cory Speroff, PLA, ASLA, CBLP is looking forward to attending this prestigious event. Get more info and register.

November 14 - 17: North American Lake Management Society International Symposium

Princeton Hydro is proud to sponsor the NALMS 2022 International Symposium, which is being held in Minnesota, the “Land of 10,000 Lakes."  The conference, themed "Leveraging Experience to Manage Diverse Lakes, Landscapes, and People," consists of presentations, workshops, panel discussions, field trips and an exhibitor hall. Senior Project Manager Christopher L. Mikolajczyk, CLM and Senior Technical Director of Ecological Services Dr. Fred Lubnow are giving a presentation titled “Development of HAB Management and Restoration Plans for Beaches and Marinas.” They hope to see you at the conference and invite you to chat with them after their presentations. Get more info and register.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT:

August 1-3: National Stream Restoration Conference

The Resource Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing America’s natural resources by restoring streams, rivers and wetlands, hosted the first-ever National Stream Restoration Conference. The 3-day event was themed “Sharing Visions for the Future,” and included two education sessions led by members of the Princeton Hydro team:

 
 

Stay tuned for more events!

[post_title] => Fall Events Spotlight: Webinars, Conferences, Community Gatherings & Continuing Ed Opportunities [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => fall-events-spotlight-2022 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-10-31 18:53:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-10-31 18:53:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11261 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 11 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11837 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-11-23 19:13:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-11-23 19:13:46 [post_content] =>

The Metedeconk River flows through over 40 miles of New Jersey's woodlands, freshwater wetlands, forested wetlands, tidal wetlands, and densely developed areas before emptying into the Barnegat Bay. The river and its watershed provide drinking water from ground and surface water sources to about 100,000 homes in Ocean and Monmouth Counties.

A tributary to the North Branch of the Metedeconk River that flows directly through Ocean County Park in Lakewood, NJ. This tributary was deemed to have water quality impairments, including fecal coliform due to the Canada Goose population and high temperature due to the exposed stream channels, which lack a significant tree-canopy. The increasing amounts of impervious land cover associated with the continued urbanization of the Metedeconk River’s Watershed was also a primary cause of water quality impairments.

American Littoral Society (ALS) partnered with Princeton Hydro and local stakeholders to implement green infrastructure projects with the goal of remedying the fecal coliform and water temperature impairments in the Park's tributary as well as improving the overall health and water quality of the Metedeconk River, its surrounding watershed, and, ultimately, the greater Barnegat Bay.

 

Green Infrastructure Design & Implementation Project

The project team designed and implemented a stormwater treatment train, which combined multiple green infrastructure stormwater management best management practices (BMPs) that work in unison to decrease NPS pollutant loading to the Metedeconk River and increase ecological diversity in Ocean County Park.

The project, which was funded by a New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection 2014 319(h) Implementation Grant, included four primary BMPs in Ocean County Park: 1. Installation of two Filterra curb-side tree boxes; 2. Construction of a vegetated bioretention/biofiltration swale; 3. Creation of a section of living shoreline along the banks of Duck Pond; and 4. Installation of two floating wetland islands in Duck Pond.

 
 

Filterra curb-side tree boxes

 

Built at street level, the Filterra™ tree box is a pre-manufactured, in-ground concrete box filled with soil media and planted with a native, noninvasive tree or shrub. It is designed to collect stormwater, absorb nutrients, and treat water before it discharges into surrounding waterbodies.

For this project, two Filterra™ tree box units were installed in the parking lot to the north of Ocean County Park's swimming beach and each planted with serviceberry shrubs. The boxes serve to catch and treat stormwater runoff flowing from the parking lot.


Vegetated Bioswale

 

Unlike a traditional drainage basin that simply collects water, a vegetated bioswale uses native plants to reduce the volume of stormwater runoff, decrease total phosphorus loading, and prevent debris, sediment, and pollutants from flowing into the Metedeconk River and other surrounding waterbodies.

For this project, the team designed and implemented a .07-acre bioswale adjacent to the park's main parking lot. Installation of the vegetated bioswale began by removing existing vegetation, excavating the ground north of the parking lot, and then regrading it per the specifications on the plans. Once proper grading was established, the basin was planted with native species including Joe Pye Weed, Blue Mistflower, Jacob Cline Bee Balm, Orange Coneflower, and Wrinkleleaf Goldenrod.


Living Shoreline Along Duck Pond

[caption id="attachment_11850" align="aligncenter" width="767"] Photo by American Littoral Society[/caption]  

Living shorelines use a variety of native plants to filter runoff, create and improve habitat for aquatic animals, increase water quality, and protect the shoreline from erosion. Two sections of bulkhead along the North and South edges of Ocean County Park's Duck Pond were removed so that the bank could be sloped naturally into the pond and populated with vegetation. The design serves as an additional point of stormwater collection and filtration, significantly reducing the amount of water flowing into nearby paved parking areas.

The northern portion of the living shoreline encompasses 0.06 acres and spans 100 feet along the shore. The southern portion  encompasses 0.18 acres and spans 40 feet along the shore. The living shorelines were seeded and then planted with Green Bulrush, Helen’s Flower, Switchgrass, Blue Mistflower, New England Aster, Upright Sedge, and Little BlueStem.


Floating Wetland Islands in Duck Pond

A floating wetland island is made up of a plastic matrix that is planted with water-loving native vegetation. The matrix promotes the growth of a healthy microbial community. The biofilm that develops on the plants' roots and within the island matrix, contribute toward the uptake of nutrients within the waterbody thus improving water quality. Floating wetland islands are anticipated to remove an estimated 17.33 lbs of phosphorus and 566.67 lbs of nitrogen each year, as well as promote a balanced ecosystem through the promotion of “healthy” bacteria and plankton.

Two 250-square-foot floating wetland islands made of polyethylene terephthalate layers were populated with native wetland plants and installed in Duck Pond. The plant pockets were then filled with a biomix of soil and peat, and a variety of native plant species were planted on both islands, including: Swamp Milkweed, Upright Sedge, Common Boneset, Crimson Eyed Rosemallow, and Blue Flag Iris.


Volunteer Involvement & Community Education

Given the magnitude of the project and the high-profile nature of Barnegat Bay, community education and outreach was an essential element of the project and its long-term success. Throughout the course of the project, efforts were made to increase public understanding of the project and to encourage public input in the design of the green infrastructure BMPs and the living shoreline.

The education and outreach was a collaborative effort led by ALS, with support provided by the Ocean County Department of Parks and Recreation, Georgian Court University, Brick Municipal utilities Authority, NJDEP, and Princeton Hydro.

The team conducted public presentations and meetings, installed educational signs to accompany the water quality improvement techniques that were implemented, created a website dedicated to providing project details and updates, and invited local residents to participate in shoreline restoration and floating wetland island planting efforts.


Successful Outcome

Following the project, in-situ and discrete water quality monitoring was conducted in stream in order to assess the effectiveness of the above BMPs. The combined green infrastructure and living shoreline elements of this project set the stage for a much needed effort to reduce nonpoint source pollution loading and address waterfowl-related pathogen impacts to Ocean County Park’s lakes and the Metedeconk River. It also heightened public awareness of nonpoint source pollution and the benefits of green infrastructure measures in the abatement of water quality problems.

The project serves as a model for proper stormwater management and living shoreline creation throughout both the Metedeconk River and Barnegat Bay Watersheds.


To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s robust natural resource management and restoration services, click here. Click here to read about another stormwater management green infrastructure project recently completed in Thompson Park, the largest developed park in the New Jersey's Middlesex County park system.  

[post_title] => Designing & Implementing Green Infrastructure in the Metedeconk River Watershed [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => designing-implementing-green-infrastructure-in-the-metedeconk-river-watershed [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-12-02 15:20:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-12-02 15:20:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11837 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 295 [max_num_pages] => 27 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => 1 [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => 1 [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 0c0b6da4e6092575480bd32d36c8c011 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [allow_query_attachment_by_filename:protected] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

Blog

archive
 
Topics
Select Topics