search
WP_Query Object
(
    [query] => Array
        (
            [page] => 
            [pagename] => blog
        )

    [query_vars] => Array
        (
            [page] => 0
            [pagename] => blog
            [error] => 
            [m] => 
            [p] => 0
            [post_parent] => 
            [subpost] => 
            [subpost_id] => 
            [attachment] => 
            [attachment_id] => 0
            [name] => 
            [page_id] => 0
            [second] => 
            [minute] => 
            [hour] => 
            [day] => 0
            [monthnum] => 0
            [year] => 0
            [w] => 0
            [category_name] => 
            [tag] => 
            [cat] => 
            [tag_id] => 
            [author] => 
            [author_name] => 
            [feed] => 
            [tb] => 
            [paged] => 1
            [meta_key] => 
            [meta_value] => 
            [preview] => 
            [s] => 
            [sentence] => 
            [title] => 
            [fields] => 
            [menu_order] => 
            [embed] => 
            [category__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [category__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [category__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [post__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_name__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag_slug__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag_slug__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_parent__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_parent__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [author__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [author__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [search_columns] => Array
                (
                )

            [posts_per_page] => 11
            [ignore_sticky_posts] => 
            [suppress_filters] => 
            [cache_results] => 1
            [update_post_term_cache] => 1
            [update_menu_item_cache] => 
            [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1
            [update_post_meta_cache] => 1
            [post_type] => 
            [nopaging] => 
            [comments_per_page] => 5
            [no_found_rows] => 
            [order] => DESC
        )

    [tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object
        (
            [queries] => Array
                (
                )

            [relation] => AND
            [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [queried_terms] => Array
                (
                )

            [primary_table] => ph_posts
            [primary_id_column] => ID
        )

    [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object
        (
            [queries] => Array
                (
                )

            [relation] => 
            [meta_table] => 
            [meta_id_column] => 
            [primary_table] => 
            [primary_id_column] => 
            [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [clauses:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [has_or_relation:protected] => 
        )

    [date_query] => 
    [queried_object] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 6
            [post_author] => 1
            [post_date] => 2021-01-18 12:51:43
            [post_date_gmt] => 2021-01-18 12:51:43
            [post_content] => 
            [post_title] => Blog
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => closed
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => blog
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2021-01-18 12:51:43
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-01-18 12:51:43
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?page_id=6
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => page
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [queried_object_id] => 6
    [request] => 
					SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  ph_posts.ID
					FROM ph_posts 
					WHERE 1=1  AND ((ph_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (ph_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR ph_posts.post_status = 'acf-disabled')))
					
					ORDER BY ph_posts.menu_order, ph_posts.post_date DESC
					LIMIT 0, 11
				
    [posts] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 14482
                    [post_author] => 1
                    [post_date] => 2024-02-19 14:53:47
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2024-02-19 14:53:47
                    [post_content] => 

In Warrington Township, Pennsylvania, an innovative ecological uplift initiative is underway at Lion's Pride Park. This project aims to transform a stagnant pond, overrun with invasive species and plagued by water quality issues, into a thriving wetland mosaic. This endeavor, a collaborative effort between Warrington Township, Princeton Hydro, and other stakeholders, promises to not only revitalize the natural environment but also enhance community access and education within the park.

[caption id="attachment_14494" align="aligncenter" width="802"] Historical photo of Lion's Pride Park pond in Warrington Township, PA.[/caption]

Restoration Overview and Community Impact

Spanning 47 acres, Lion's Pride Park serves as a green oasis within the Township, offering a range of recreational and educational opportunities for visitors of all ages and abilities.

The pond within the park was in urgent need of restoration - heavy storm events caused the pond to overflow, which created flooding conditions in the park. The local native biodiversity was being threatened by nusiance and invasive species like water chestnut (Trapa natans). The photos below were taken in April 2020.

[gallery link="none" columns="2" size="medium" ids="14485,14486"]  

Princeton Hydro began in 2020 with site investigation and field surveys, including:

  1. Bathymetric assessment to map water depth and accumulated unconsolidated sediment in the pond
  2. Sediment sampling to facilitate options for the potential reuse of the sediment on site and the selection of native vegetation for the various habitats being created
  3. Wetland delineation to identify existing wetland boundaries within and adjacent to the project site and discern the extent of jurisdictional impacts related to the proposed activities.

The most substantial component for the restoration project was the conversion of the existing pond to an emergent wetland complex to provide habitat for a wide variety of native species. Using the completed existing conditions reports and surveys, Princeton Hydro prepared the conceptual design plan that informed the entire restoration process.

Princeton Hydro Regulatory Compliance & Wildlife Surveys Project Manager Emily Bjorhus, PWS spearheaded the regulatory program for the project, navigating approvals from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the Bucks County Conservation District. The permitting process laid the groundwork for the smooth implementation of this design-build restoration project.

[gallery link="none" columns="2" size="medium" ids="14253,14244"] [caption id="attachment_14493" align="aligncenter" width="1227"] October 2023[/caption]  

The restoration work encompassed various stages, from earthwork and vegetation planting to the installation of ADA-compliant pathways and informational signage. Some of the key project elements, include:

Channel stabilization: Stabilizing the channels within the park, addressing erosion issues, enhancing water flow dynamics, and promoting the establishment of diverse aquatic habitats.

Berm construction: Installing berms to enhance wetland habitat and promote natural floodplain connectivity, contributing to the resilience of the ecosystem to flooding events.

Native vegetation planting: Reintroducing native wetland and riparian plant species to enhance biodiversity and create habitat corridors for wildlife within the park. Planting is expected to take place in the Spring.

Interpretive signage installation: Placing educational signage throughout the park to inform visitors about the ecological significance of the restoration project and the importance of wetland conservation.

Boardwalk installation: Constructing a 6-foot-wide ADA-compliant boardwalk that spanned approximately 230 linear feet, providing visitors with accessible pathways to explore the restored wetland areas.

[gallery columns="2" link="none" size="medium" ids="14491,14490,14492,14487"]

Through these strategic interventions, the Lion's Pride Park Ecological Restoration Project aims to not only rejuvenate the ecological integrity of landscape but also enrich the recreational and educational experiences of the community. The project, which is slated for 100% completion this Spring, will totally transform the landscape into a diverse wetland complex that fosters native wildlife habitat, mitigates water quality concerns, reduces nonpoint source pollutants discharged to downstream waters, and provides accessible pathways and observation platforms so all community members may enjoy and learn from this restored aquatic setting.

The reclaimed wetland provides additional bird and pollinator habitat and offer visitors a diverse ecosystem to learn from within the park. By fostering a deeper connection to nature and promoting environmental stewardship, this project exemplifies the transformative power of ecological restoration in creating vibrant, sustainable communities.


Upcoming Presentation

[caption id="attachment_13487" align="alignleft" width="247"] Emily out field performing a wetland delineation.[/caption]

On March 23, at the 2024 Watershed Congress hosted by the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, Emily will be presenting about the Lion's Pride Park Ecological Restoration Project. Her presentation will offer insights into the regulatory approval and permitting process, takes a deeper dive into the restoration strategies, and showcases the ecological significance of the project. Click here to learn more about the 2024 Watershed Congress.

Emily, a certified Professional Wetland Scientist, is a Project Manager that specializes in environmental regulatory compliance, ecological services and wildlife surveys. She leads federal, state and local environmental permitting processes, NEPA compliance and documentation, Endangered Species Act Section 7 consultations, and Clean Water Act Section 404(b)1 analyses.


The Lion's Pride Park Ecological Restoration Project exemplifies a holistic approach to environmental conservation, community engagement, and public recreation. By repurposing a neglected pond into a vibrant wetland mosaic, this initiative embodies the principles of ecological resilience and inclusive urban planning, and celebrates the transformative potential of ecological uplift projects in fostering healthier, more vibrant communities.

Please stay tuned to our blog for more project updates once planting is completed this Spring. Click here to read more about Princeton Hydro’s robust natural resource management and restoration services.

[post_title] => Restoring Balance: Converting a Pond into a Wetland Mosaic at Lion’s Pride Park [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => restoring-balance-converting-a-pond-into-a-wetland-mosaic-at-lions-pride-park [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-02-20 12:32:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-02-20 12:32:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=14482 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14409 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2024-02-10 07:12:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2024-02-10 07:12:51 [post_content] =>

New Jersey’s water-related infrastructure is a complex system, constantly facing the challenges posed by stormwater runoff and working to properly manage it. Stormwater management isn’t just about handling rainfall; it’s a critical aspect of preserving water quality and mitigating flooding risks. In New Jersey, where urbanization and rainfall patterns intersect, managing stormwater is more than just a priority; it’s a necessity. Enter a stormwater utility— a dedicated fee to address these stormwater management challenges.

Stormwater Utilities in New Jersey

New Jersey’s stormwater infrastructure (storm drains, sewer piping, etc.) is aging and unable to effectively handle the amount of runoff that has been flowing through the region in recent years. This is causing increased nutrient runoff and flooding in communities throughout the state. With increasing global temperatures and the proliferation of intense storm systems, this trend is likely to continue.

To address these issues, in 2019, New Jersey enacted the Clean Stormwater & Flood Reduction Law that allows municipalities, counties, groups of municipalities, and sewage and improvement authorities to establish a stormwater utility.

For many local leaders, the process to establish a utility can be complex, often depending on a number of details like the scope of the work and size of the community. In 2021, Princeton Hydro teamed up with the New Jersey League of Conservation Voters, New Jersey Future, and Flood Defense New Jersey to host a webinar explaining the purpose of a stormwater utility; how a stormwater utility works; how to decide if a stormwater utility is the right fit for a particular community; and how municipalities or counties can implement one.

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUvD79bjiPQ[/embed]

In 2022, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) announced the availability of Technical Assistance for Stormwater Utility Feasibility Studies, which supports municipalities in completing a stormwater utility feasibility study. Stormwater feasibility studies can help communities weigh the costs and benefits of having a stormwater utility to determine if it's right for them. Princeton Hydro is currently conducting a feasibility study for the City of Lambertville.


Jersey Water Works Stormwater Utility Information Forum

Jersey Water Works is a collaborative effort of many diverse organizations and individuals who embrace the common purpose of transforming New Jersey’s water infrastructure. They bring people together to find equitable solutions focused on: Clean water and waterways; healthier, safer neighborhoods; local jobs; flood and climate resilience; and economic growth. Jersey Water Works consists of many different committees run by volunteers, including the Stormwater Utilities Subcommittee, which is part of the Asset Management and Finance Committee.

The Jersey Waterworks Stormwater Utility Subcommittee launched the “Stormwater Utility Informational Forum” comprising five one-hour-long, town-hall-style education sessions. Each session featured expert panelists who explored various aspects of creating a stormwater utility and establishing a sustainable and dedicated funding mechanism to pay for a community’s stormwater management program.

Utility leaders, government stormwater managers, municipal and county representatives, elected officials, experts and stakeholders came together to discuss the topics of stormwater financial planning and funding options; New Jersey legislation and the utility development process; stormwater rate structures and credits; stormwater utility policies; and stakeholder engagement.

Key leaders in the Stormwater Utility subcommittee who organized the information forum include Dana Patterson Grear, Director of Marketing and Communications for Princeton Hydro (co-chair); Micah Shapiro of RES (co-chair); Prabha Kumar of Black & Veatch Management Consulting LLC; and Elizabeth Treadway of WSP. The forum presenters included Prabha Kumar, Elizabeth Treadway, Dana Patterson Grear, Dave Mason of CDM Smith; Lindsey Sigmund of New Jersey Future.


The Art of Stakeholder Engagement

Prabha Kumar and Dana Patterson Grear led the final session of the forum, which was dedicated to Stakeholder Engagement. They shared their expert recommendations and real-world experience in fostering community involvement, navigating the complexities of stakeholder engagement, and developing inclusive public meetings and dialogues related to implementing a stormwater utility feasibility study.

The presentation emphasized the significance of prioritizing stakeholder engagement early on and maintaining consistent engagement throughout the entire stormwater utility feasibility process. Prabha and Dana also provided tons of easy-to-follow, actionable tips, including:

  • How to structure your stakeholder groups, including the creation of a project team, a project champion and internal steering committee;

  • Which local community groups, municipal entities, and other external stakeholders to include in the conversation and when to include them;

  • Key factors in planning public workshops, like how many workshops to host, should the workshops be virtual or in-person, and how to structure the agenda for the best results; and

  • How to create engaging graphics, solicit feedback and educate the target audience in ways that are inclusive, informative and tailored to the unique characteristics of the community.

"Creating a stormwater utility in your community can be challenging as it is a public policymaking process. Engaging stakeholders throughout the entire process and educating the public is not just a step; it's the cornerstone to success," said Dana. "It's about embracing a  diversity of voices from day one, listening to concerns and ideas, and collaboratively shaping a solution that resonates with your communities' needs."

Watch the full presentation.

[embed]https://youtu.be/WFeVCMrMlJE?si=qu8h-v8ESwrzAigd[/embed]

Continuing the Conversation

The Stormwater Utility Information Forum served as a platform for sharing expertise and fostering dialogue around supporting community efforts to properly manage stormwater and protect water quality. As the conversation continues, it's crucial to leverage these insights to drive meaningful change in stormwater management initiatives across New Jersey.

The sessions were held via Zoom and the recordings of the forum sessions made available on the Jersey Water Works website. The recorded sessions serve as invaluable resources for individuals, communities, and policymakers interested in delving deeper into stormwater management.

The journey towards sustainable stormwater management is ongoing. If you or your community are interested in furthering this cause or exploring a stormwater utility, don't hesitate to reach out. The Jersey Water Works Stormwater Utility Subcommittee and Princeton Hydro welcome all voices committed to creating a more resilient and equitable water infrastructure. For more information about the Stormwater Utility Subcommittee or to get involved, please contact info@jerseywaterworks.org. Also, please explore New Jersey Future's New Jersey Stormwater Utility Resource Center which is a treasure trove of resources on this topic!

Princeton Hydro is a leader in innovative, cost-effective, and environmentally sound stormwater management systems. The preparation of stormwater management plans and design of stormwater management systems for pollutant reduction is an integral part of our projects - learn more.

[post_title] => In the Eye of the Storm: Exploring A Stormwater Utility in New Jersey [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => exploring-a-stormwater-utility-in-new-jersey [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-02-21 17:08:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-02-21 17:08:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=14409 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14403 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2024-01-23 02:05:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2024-01-23 02:05:37 [post_content] =>

Preservation New Jersey (PNJ) honored Princeton Hydro, Clarke Caton Hintz, and Hx2 Development with the New Jersey Historic Preservation Project Award for the outstanding work to restore Roebling Wireworks and create Princeton Hydro's new Trenton headquarters.

The project, designed by Clarke Caton Hintz and constructed by Hx2 Development, successfully converted the historic Roebling Carpentry Shop (Building 110) located in Trenton’s Wirerope District into a cutting-edge office space while preserving key elements of the original building's character.

Each year, PNJ reviews entities that have significantly contributed to historic preservation or made sustained efforts to promote New Jersey's rich history. Award nominees were evaluated by a panel of in-state and out-of-state preservation experts, considering criteria such as public impact, quality and creativity of the effort, increased public awareness, expanded partnerships, and the submission's overall quality.

The 2023 Preservation Awards were presented during a sold-out event of 125 guests hosted by Preservation New Jersey at Masker’s Barn in Berkeley Heights. 14 awardees were honored for excellence in preservation.

[gallery columns="4" link="none" ids="14425,14423,14427,14424"] Proceeds from the awards event were dedicated to the 10 Most Endangered Historic Places in New Jersey program and education initiatives managed by Preservation New Jersey’s Programs & Events Committee. Click here for a complete list of award winners and more photos from the event. 

The revitalization of the historic Roebling Carpentry Shop (Building 110) and the creation of Princeton Hydro’s headquarters office was recognized as a significant economic development milestone for the City of Trenton. The top floor of the building, comprising approximately 9,000 square feet, seamlessly blends historic elements like heavy timber trusses, factory windows, and exposed brickwork with state-of-the-art building systems, striking finishes, and modern amenities.

  [caption id="attachment_7920" align="aligncenter" width="565"] 1908 image of Block 3 of the John A. Roebling's Sons Company, including the Carpentry Shop; the Delaware & Raritan Canal, now Route 129, is in the foreground.[/caption]   [gallery link="none" size="medium" ids="7919,7917,7918"]  

The project received tremendous support from the City of Trenton and Greater Trenton, the local organization dedicated to advancing revitalization efforts in the City. The redevelopment of Building 110 is part of the larger revitalization of Roebling Center, which includes five historic industrial buildings on Block 3 of the John A. Roebling’s Sons Company. Phase 1, completed in 2018, included the opening of Roebling Lofts, a unique 138-unit loft apartment building located in Building 101 of the Roebling Complex.

In May 2022, Princeton Hydro and the City of Trenton hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate the opening of the new headquarters office. The move brought more than 30 jobs to Trenton, revitalizing a building vacant for over 25 years and transforming it from an industrial space to a transit-oriented, modern office.

[gallery link="none" ids="10900,10898,10899"]

Click here to read more about the building's renovation process and view additional "before and after" photos.


About Preservation New Jersey: Established in 1978, PNJ is a statewide member-supported non-profit historic preservation organization. PNJ promotes the economic vitality, sustainability, and heritage of New Jersey’s diverse communities through advocacy and education. Learn more.

About Clarke Caton Hintz: Clarke Caton Hintz is an award-winning firm comprising architects, planners, landscape architects, and interior designers committed to solving today's planning and design challenges through a multi-disciplinary approach. Learn more.

About Princeton Hydro: Princeton Hydro is a water resources engineering and natural resources management small business committed to positively impacting ecosystems, quality of life, and communities. Formed in 1998, the firm provides integrated ecological and engineering consulting services, specializing in natural resource management, water resources engineering, geotechnical design & investigation, and regulatory compliance throughout the Northeast. Learn more.

[post_title] => Princeton Hydro's Trenton Headquarters Receives Historic Preservation Award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => princeton-hydros-trenton-headquarters-receives-historic-preservation-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-01-31 17:37:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-01-31 17:37:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=14403 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14162 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2024-01-10 15:23:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2024-01-10 15:23:09 [post_content] =>

As we celebrate the start of 2024, the Princeton Hydro team is thrilled about the multitude of events on the horizon. We're proud to be sponsoring and participating in conferences, webinars, community gatherings, and symposiums. Our blog is the go-to hub for all the event dates, detailed information, and ways to get involved. Join us in making this winter season one to remember!


January 9 - 11: 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Northeast Aquatic Plant Management Society

The Northeast Aquatic Plant Management Society (NEAPMS) is a diverse group of professionals dedicated to understanding the unique needs of aquatic plant management in the Northeast and communicating that knowledge to both the public and private sectors. The 25th Anniversary Meeting, being held at the Wentworth by the Sea in New Castle, New Hampshire, features workshops, technical presentations, poster sessions, networking events, and a banquet.

Get more info and view the full agenda here.

January 23: NJ Stormwater Retrofit BMP Guide Webinar

New Jersey Future, in partnership with Princeton Hydro, launched the New Jersey Stormwater Retrofit Best Management Practices Guide. This comprehensive resource stands as a pivotal tool to aid local and county governments, nonprofits, developers, and property owners in retrofitting stormwater infrastructure and integrating sustainable green infrastructure solutions. On January 23 at Noon, New Jersey Future and Princeton Hydro are hosting a free public webinar to review this new resource.

Get more info and register.

February 6-7: Delaware Wetlands Conference

The 10th Delaware Wetlands Conference will be held on February 6-7th at the Chase Center, on the waterfront in Wilmington, DE. The conference genda usually includes subjects such as soil science, climate adaptation, and monitoring, as well as wetland restoration and creation projects. 400 attendees, 50 different presentations and poster displays, and 30 exhibitors and sponsor tables are expected.

Princeton Hydro, a proud Conference sponsor and exhibitor, is leading four sessions:
  • Project Manager and Environmental Scientist Emily Bjorhus, PWS is presenting on "Converting a Pond into a Wetland Mosaic within Public Park," which explores the design and construction of the Lion’s Pride Park Ecological Restoration Project in Warrington, PA. The project converts a stagnant pond overrun with invasive species and water quality concerns into a diverse wetland complex that provides native wildlife habitat and reduces nonpoint source pollutants discharged to downstream waters.

  • Project Manager and Environmental Scientist Duncan Simpson, PWS is presenting on Cypress Branch Dam Removal.

  • Environmental Scientist Ivy Babson is presenting on "Third River Urban Park and Habitat Creation Project – Brownfield Turned Wetland Sanctuary."

  • Director of Regulatory Compliance and Wildlife Surveys, Michael Rehman, CERP, PWS is presenting on "Revisiting Successful Wetland Mitigation Projects — Is Five Years of Monitoring Sufficient?"

Learn more and register here.

February 15: 24th Annual Land Ethics Symposium

Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve is hosting its 24th Annual Land Ethics Symposium on February 15 from 8am - 1pm. This year's "all virtual" symposium is specifically geared towards homeowners, landscape architects, designers, contractors, land planners and municipal officials. Participants will learn how to create ecologically sound and economically viable landscapes through the use of native plants and sustainable practices. Princeton Hydro has been a long-time sponsor of this special event.

Get more info and register.

February 23: Seventh Annual Watershed Conference

The 7th Annual Watershed Institute Watershed Conference, themed "Regional Watershed Planning," will be held in a hybrid format. Watershed members, the general public, environmental professionals, government officials, nonprofit organization professionals, and stakeholders are all invited to attend! Princeton Hydro, a proud Conference sponsor, is leading two sessions:
  • Director of Marketing and Communications Dana Patterson Grear, along with team members from The Watershed Institute and New Jersey Future, is leading a session on community engagement. The panel will cover how officials/municipal staff can engage their communities on the MS4 permit requirements, implement a public education and outreach program, collaborate with Spanish-speaking populations, and encourage community participation in stormwater-related activities.

  • Senior Technical Director, Ecological Services, Dr. Fred Lubnow, will be joining a panel to discuss the valuable ecosystem services associated with watershed management, with a focus on watershed planning and nutrient management.

Get more info and register.

February 28 - 29: Pennsylvania Lake Management Society Annual Conference

Pennsylvania Lake Management Society is hosting its 34th Annual Conference. This year's event, themed "Bringing it Back Home," will be held at the Wyndham Garden in State College, PA. Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor of the conference, which offers a collection of professional presentations, workshops and panel discussions focused on topics like threats to our waters, new scientific discoveries, and homegrown solutions to improving water quality. Princeton Hydro Senior Technical Director of Ecological Services Dr. Fred Lubnow is presenting on "Assessing the Potential for Harmful Algal Blooms Over the Winter and Early Spring Seasons."

Get more info and register.


March 7: Regulatory Roundtable at Joint Base MDL

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) New Jersey and Philadelphia Posts in conjunction with Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst (JBMDL) with be hosting a Regulatory Roundtable on Thursday, March 7, 2024. This event will be a day-long seminar in-person at Tommy B’s Community Center at JBMDL. The program will identify regulatory challenges, sustainability and alternative energy initiatives, procurement/contracting opportunities, and ongoing activities specifically at JBMDL. Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor of the roundtable. And, Princeton Hydro's Director of Marketing and Communications Dana Patterson Grear,  a co-organizer of the event, looks forward to seeing you there!

Get more info and register.

March 12 - 14: Coastal and Climate Resilience Conference

The New Jersey Coastal Resilience Collaborative and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection invite you to the 2024 New Jersey Coastal & Climate Resilience Conference. The two-day conference, held at Monmouth University in West Long Branch New Jersey, will focus on resilience projects in Monmouth County such as flood barriers, resilient building design, and natural shoreline restoration. Participants will have the opportunity to engage with New Jersey experts and leaders on the current state of coastal science and research, climate resilience and resilience planning, coastal management, ecological restoration, and other related topics. Princeton Hydro's Dana Patterson Grear will be presenting on "Communicating Climate Change: How to Build a Digital Communications Toolkit for Climate Action." We hope to see you there! Early bird registration rates are available until January 31.

Get more info and register.


March 20: 2024 Achieving Climate Resilience Through Water Symposium

Join the Sustainable Business Network of Greater Philadelphia for its day-long conference that convenes business-owners, professionals, and other interested parties that work in the green stormwater infrastructure field and other issues relating to water management, quality, equity, and climate resilience. The symposium will be held at the Science History Institute and will include special guests & speakers, technical and engaging sessions, breakfast and lunch, refreshments, and excellent opportunities for growing your networks. Princeton Hydro's Dana Patterson Grear and WSP's Elizabeth Treadway will be presenting on, "Stormwater Utility: A Mechanism for Funding Green Stormwater Infrastructure Projects in Your Community".

Register for the symposium.

March 23: 2024 Watershed Congress

Presented by the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, the 2024 Watershed Congress, will take place at the Montgomery County Community College in Pottstown. This year includes an in-person program on March 23 along with several virtual sessions the week following. Attendees can select a full access ticket, in-person only ticket, or virtual only ticket. The in-person program will be presented in three parts: a Keynote Speaker, Breakout Sessions, and a Closing Plenary. Presentation topics include native plants, riparian buffers, civic engagement for environmental protection, and “Converting a Pond into a Wetland Mosaic within a Public Park,” led by Emily Bjorhus, PWS.

Get more info and register.

April 19: Coastal Resilience in NJ - Funding Through Implementation

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) New Jersey Post will be hosting its annual day-long seminar in celebration of Earth Day on Friday, April 19, 2024. This New Jersey-focused event will be in-person at the Rutgers EcoComplex in Fieldsboro, New Jersey and have presentors from representation from local, state, and federal governments, NGOs, and academia.

*More details coming soon!*

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: A LOOK BACK ON EXCITING EVENTS FROM 2023

2023 NJ-AWRA Stormwater Webinar

New Jersey Section of American Water Resources Association (NJ-AWRA) hosted a free  Stormwater webinar, which featured three presentations: Stormwater Regulatory Updates and Green Infrastructure Overview led by Brian Friedlich, P.E.; NJ Future Initiatives - MS4 Primer and Stormwater Retrofits Manual led by Lindsey Sigmund; and Green Infrastructure Case Study - Clawson Park led by Dr. Stephen J. Souza

Princeton Hydro was involved in the design and implementation of stormwater management upgrades to Clawson Park in Ringoes, NJ. Hundreds of native plants were installed in the park’s large stormwater basin and two of the park’s rain gardens were completely overhauled, removing invasive weeds and planting beneficial native species. To learn more about the project, click here.


2023 Technical Friday Webinar - The New Stormwater Rule and Proposed Enhancements

As part of its Technical Friday webinar series, The Watershed Institute hosted a webinar to provide guidance on New Jersey's new stormwater ordinances, a summary of requirements, and recommendations for developing and implementing stronger ordinances. The webinar featured two expert speakers: Princeton Hydro Senior Technical Director of Engineering Dr. Clay Emerson, PE, CFM, and The Watershed Institute Policy Director Michael Pisauro, Esq.

WATCH NOW.

 

Stay tuned for more events!

[post_title] => Winter Events Spotlight: Climate Resilience, Stormwater Management, and Wetland Restoration [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => winter-events-spotlight-2024 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-02-20 01:53:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-02-20 01:53:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=14162 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14108 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2023-12-21 00:22:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2023-12-21 00:22:23 [post_content] =>

As the year draws to a close, it's the perfect time to reflect on the milestones and successes that have shaped the past twelve months. We're excited to take this opportunity to express our gratitude to our incredible clients, partners, and friends. Your support and collaboration have been the driving force behind our achievements. Join us as we revisit and celebrate our top 10 successes of 2023:

1. CELEBRATED 25 YEARS OF SUCCESS.

As we joyfully celebrate our 25th anniversary year at Princeton Hydro, we are filled with gratitude for the incredible journey. Over the past quarter-century, our firm has been dedicated to improving our ecosystems, quality of life, and communities for the better, and it's an honor to reflect on the milestones we've achieved together. Since our inception in 1998, working with 2,000 clients, we have removed 84 dams, restored dozens of miles of rivers, improved water quality in hundreds of ponds and lakes, and enhanced thousands of acres of wetlands in the Northeast. Thank you for being an integral part of our journey!


2. DESIGNED AND OVERSAW THE REMOVAL OF 5 DAMS.

Over the past year, we completed five dam removal projects. We worked with Wildlands Conservancy to remove two dams from Bushkill Creek, a tributary to the Delaware River, opening up several miles of river to migratory fish and critical species. We partnered with the Musconetcong Watershed Association to remove Beatty's Mill Dam, a critical step in restoring the Musconetcong River and addressing long-standing concerns regarding flood mitigation and the preservation of essential habitats. On Pohatcong Creek, we decommissioned a defunct dam for the Pinelands Regional Board of Education. And, working with The Nature Conservancy, we kicked off the removal of the 128-year-old hazardous Paulina Dam, reconnecting over 7.6 miles of mainstream and tributary habitat along the Paulins Kill. Highlighting our dedication and expertise in this field, our firm's president and founding principal, Geoffrey M. Goll, P.E., was recently featured on a Top 20 podcast. His discussion provides insights into the complexities and significance of dam removal.


3. EARNED 6 PRESTIGIOUS AWARDS.

This year, we are proud to share that our firm earned the Society for American Military Engineers NJ Post’s 2023 Small Business Award! Our newly restored Trenton office earned two top tier awards: 2023 New Good Neighbor Award and NJ Historic Preservation Award. Two of our projects were spotlighted too: Lake Hopatcong Foundation’s Floating Classroom received the very honorable New Jersey Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award and the Readington Digital ERI won an ANJEC 2023 Environmental Achievement Award. And, a big shout out to Duncan Simpson who earned the SAME Mid-Maryland Post President’s Commendation Award.


4. BROKE GROUND ON LIBERTY STATE PARK ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT.

Liberty State Park, located on the west bank of Upper New York Bay, is one of the most visited state parks in the nation. Within 235 acres of this highly urbanized setting, Princeton Hydro was contracted to design a resilient coastal ecosystem that provides both ecological and social benefits. In a momentous event, the Commissioner of NJDEP, Commander of USACE New York District, and local elected officials broke ground for the Liberty State Park Ecosystem Restoration Project. When constructed, it will have 80 acres of tidal and non-tidal wetlands and several hundred feet of intertidal shoreline and shallow water habitat, making it the largest ecosystem restoration project in New Jersey.


5. CELEBRATED NUMEROUS STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS.

Our team members continue to amaze us with their drive to expand knowledge and grow personally. This past year, several staff earned new licenses and certifications: Marissa Ciocco earned her Professional Engineer license in Delaware. Eric Zawatski achieved The Wildlife Society’s “Associate Wildlife Biologist” certification. Michael Allers became a licensed FAA-Certified Commercial Drone Pilot. Mark Gallagher was appointed to two boards: the Outdoor Equity Alliance Advisory Committee and Friends of Abbots Marshland Advisory Board. Dana Patterson was voted in as First Vice President of NJ SAME Post and Duncan Simpson, PWS was voted in as Second Vice President of the Mid-Maryland SAME Post.


6. SECURED $2.43 MILLION IN GRANTS FOR OUR CLIENTS.

One of Princeton Hydro’s core offerings is grant writing for our nonprofit and government clients. This year alone, we assisted in securing $2.43 million in grant funding from a variety of programs, including the NJDEP Stormwater Assistance Grants, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, NJDEP Natural Climate Solutions Grant, Restore America’s Estuaries National Estuaries Program Watersheds Grant Program, and New Jersey Highlands Council Planning Grant Program. The pivotal projects include building green infrastructure, developing watershed management programs, controlling invasive species, and planting hundreds of trees.


7. PARTICIPATED IN 50+ CONFERENCES, WORKSHOPS, OR LECTURES AND SPONSORED 35+ EVENTS.

We traveled around the Northeast and beyond to share our project stories and lessons learned. For the Watershed Institute’s 6th Annual Conference, we led two presentations focused on stormwater management, improving water quality, and reducing flooding. Our Senior Technical Director of Engineering Dr. Clay Emerson, PE, CFM, led two webinars for the Watershed Institute this year. The first one, "Enhanced Stormwater Management Ordinances," provided guidance on NJDEP’s new stormwater ordinances and recommendations for developing and implementing stronger ordinances. The second webinar, “Stormwater Design: Myths and Misconceptions,” provided guidance on incorporating best practices and submitting design proposals that address New Jersey’s stormwater management goals. For the Resource Institute's 2023 National Stream Restoration Conference, Jake Dittes, PE and Duncan Simpson, PWS presented on Hudson Valley Dam removal and showcased the importance of projects like the Maiden Lane Dam removal in preserving our natural treasures. We led five presentations during this year's North American Lake Management Society International Symposium. The topics included harmful algal bloom mitigation, stormwater management for lake communities, and monitoring. We are honored to have sponsored over $26,000 to nonprofit events and fundraisers, and the Marketing Team is proud to have exhibited at 15 conferences, festivals, and local events.


8. WELCOMED 9 NEW TEAM MEMBERS.

This year, we welcomed Controller Barry Shallenberger to our Business Administration team. Four engineers joined: Sean Walsh, PE as a Senior Project Manager; Rebecca Adamo, PE and Lexie Seifert as Water Resource Engineers; and Ryan Eno, EIT as a Staff Engineer. We grew our Landscape Architecture team with the addition of Angelica Diaz, and bolstered our Ecological Engineering group with Restoration Ecologist Michael Allers. We also welcomed two interns this summer, Mikhail Velez (Communications) and Jackson Tilves (Aquatics), who have now joined our staff permanently. And, last but certainly not least, we promoted six of our four-legged team members to Chief Happiness Officers!


9. RELEASED 3 NEW RESOURCES FOR THE PUBLIC.

Working with New Jersey Future, we published the NJ Stormwater Retrofit Best Management Practices Guide, a comprehensive resource and pivotal tool that aids local and county governments, nonprofits, developers, and property owners in retrofitting stormwater infrastructure and integrating sustainable green infrastructure solutions. We partnered with New York - New Jersey Harbor & Estuary Program and the Hudson River Foundation to create a toolkit for addressing problematic road-stream crossings. The easy-to-use matrix helps to prioritize potential projects and identify solutions. In partnership with Readington Township in New Jersey,  we developed New Jersey’s first interactive Environmental Resource Inventory (ERI) in digital format, paving the way for a more modernized, easily accessible, and highly functional resource. Readington Township was chosen as the recipient of the ANJEC “2023 Environmental Achievement Award" in the Environmental Commission category for creating the ERI. We've conducted two insightful 'Facebook Live Chat' Q&A sessions featuring four of our experts, which we recorded as informative resources available for ongoing access. The first session shared valuable spring gardening tips from our Landscape Architects. The second event, 'Birding in Your Backyard,' was hosted by two of our scientists who are passionate about birding.


10. GIVING BACK TO THE CITY OF TRENTON.

Since opening our Trenton Headquarters office, we have donated the use of our space for a variety of nonprofit organization events. In 2023, we hosted Revolutionary Trenton’s Launch Event, Boys and Girls club of Mercer County, Capital Philharmonic of New Jersey, Outdoor Equity Alliance Board Meeting, and African American Cultural Collaborative of Mercer County’s African American History Bowl Scholarship Presentation. We held donation drives here too to support local nonprofit organizations working in Trenton. During our Spring 2023 Staff Donation Drive, we collected 208 pounds of shelf-stable food items for Arm In Arm, a Trenton-based nonprofit organization that addresses food and housing insecurity in the city and surrounding areas. For our Holiday Employee Virtual Giving Event, 19 staff donated 72 items valued over $1560 to Children’s Home Society of New Jersey. Inspiring local youth to pursue a pathway in the STEM fields is also a priority for our firm. This year, we volunteered our time to support community programs like NJDEP’s Youth Inclusion Initiative and Hold High the Torch’s Eco Innovators for Youth STEAM (science, technology, engineering, the arts, and mathematics) Leaders Program.


Gratitude fills us, knowing these milestones were made possible by your support. Cheers to YOU and the promise of many more successes ahead! [post_title] => A Year in Review: Top 10 Successes of 2023 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => top-10-successes-of-2023 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-02-19 18:47:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-02-19 18:47:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=14108 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14130 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2023-12-19 00:16:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2023-12-19 00:16:06 [post_content] =>

We are thrilled to announce that Princeton Hydro has been honored with the 2023 Small Business Award by the Society for American Military Engineers (SAME) NJ Post. This accolade celebrates the firm's commitment to advancing the objectives of SAME, fostering collaboration among government and industry leaders to address crucial national security infrastructure challenges.

The award was presented during the SAME NJ Post Annual Holiday and Awards Luncheon, held on December 5 at the Harvest Moon Brewery in New Brunswick. Princeton Hydro's founding member and President, Geoffrey M. Goll, P.E., Chief Operating Officer Megan Hunter Ruf, and Director of Marketing & Communications Dana Patterson proudly represented our team and accepted this esteemed award from the SAME NJ Post President Edward Blanar.

Since joining SAME as a sustaining member in 2018, Princeton Hydro has played an active role in supporting the organization's mission. This year, Ms. Patterson was elected as the First Vice President of SAME NJ Post Board of Directors.  Her pivotal role since joining Princeton Hydro in October 2018 has been instrumental in shaping the firm's involvement within SAME.

Ms. Patterson's commitment and dedication to SAME have been acknowledged through various appointments and honors, including her election to the SAME New Jersey Post Board of Directors Secretary position in 2019 and the well-deserved "Young Member Award" that same year, followed by her election as Second Vice President in 2021. She is an active member of the SAME NJ Post Small Business Council, co-chair of the annual Coastal Resilience in New Jersey seminar, and assists with the organization's digital marketing.

SAME annually bestows awards and medals to commend outstanding contributions from individuals, companies, and uniformed teams and units in support of the Society, the A/E/C profession, and national security. In addition to the Small Business Award, the 2023 NJ Post Annual Award categories and winners included:

  • Distinguished Service Award: Doug Sullivan of Dewberry;
  • Young Members Award: Sydney Blasi of Sovereign Consulting; and
  • Notable Achievement Award: Paulo Rodriguez Heyman.

The sponsors of this year's award luncheon, include Cullen Company, The Engineers Club of New Jersey, The Lewis Group, Montrose Environmental, Solutions³ LLC, Enviroscapes, and Princeton Hydro.

For more insights into the initiatives and impact of the national SAME organization, click here. Please enjoy a few more photos from the awards luncheon:

[gallery link="none" ids="14132,14133,14131"] [post_title] => Princeton Hydro Receives 2023 Small Business Award from SAME NJ Post [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => princeton-hydro-receives-2023-small-business-award-from-same-nj-post [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2023-12-22 17:45:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2023-12-22 17:45:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=14130 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13982 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2023-12-13 14:58:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2023-12-13 14:58:27 [post_content] =>

The Paulins Kill River, New Jersey’s third largest tributary to the Delaware River, recently marked a significant milestone in its journey to restoration. On November 24, a crucial step was taken with the notching of the Paulina Dam, signaling a pivotal moment in the effort to return the river to its natural state. This initiative, led by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and supported by a collaborative effort among several organizations, aims to restore the Paulins Kill River ecosystem, improve water quality, and allow native aquatic species to migrate freely.

[caption id="attachment_13988" align="aligncenter" width="2048"] November 24, 2023, the first notch is made in the Paulina Dam. By TNC photographer David Pexton.[/caption]

Understanding the Project

[caption id="attachment_13992" align="alignleft" width="431"] Photo by David Pexton of TNC.[/caption]

Located in Blairstown Township, Warren County, the Paulina Dam has posed challenges to both the river's health and surrounding communities. It was originally constructed 128 years ago to produce hydropower, but has not functioned in that capacity for more than 50 years. Delaware River tributaries do not have the necessary size or flow to meet even a fraction of modern energy needs.

The 13-foot-high, 207-foot-long timber crib, rock-filled structure is classified as a Class II, Significant Hazard Dam due to its proximity to the Township of Blairstown. Its removal or rehabilitation became necessary to mitigate risks to life and property. Additionally, the dam has impeded fish passage along the Paulins Kill River, impacting the habitat for native brook trout and migratory species.

The dam removal and subsequent bank stabilization aims to reconnect over 7.6 miles of mainstream and tributary habitat along the river, and improve aquatic and terrestrial connectivity, improve surface water quality, enhance recreation and public safety, and eliminate the risk of a potential unplanned breach. The removal of the dam will also reconnect upstream and downstream populations of the endangered dwarf wedge and triangle floater mussels while increasing river ecology and public recreation.

Spearheaded by TNC in partnership with Blairstown Township, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Office of Natural Resource Restoration and Division of Fish and Wildlife, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Princeton Hydro, and Riverlogic-Renova Joint Venture, the project received funding through grants to support the removal of the Paulina Dam. The Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR) awarded a grant to TNC to fund a substantial portion of the removal through the Paulins Kill and Pequest Watershed Natural Resource Restoration Grant Program.

[caption id="attachment_13996" align="alignright" width="1108"] On November 27, 2023, members from the indie pop band Nation of Language visited the site to witness the dam removal team's progress.[/caption]

Notching and Deconstruction

TNC recently completed preliminary notching of the 128-year-old Paulina Dam. From November 24 through December 1, contractors from the Riverlogic-Renova Joint Venture worked in the river using heavy equipment to successfully remove a 40-foot long, six-foot high section of the structure, enabling a controlled release of the water impounded behind it.

Click below to watch as the first notch is made: [embed]https://youtu.be/XN1z2VlLeZI[/embed]

Notching is performed to dewater gradually, preventing large amounts of sediment from flowing downstream all at once and potentially harming habitat. The gradual deconstruction ensures the river's stability and minimizes environmental disruption. The project team made subsequent reductions of the dam's height by one foot each day, totaling a six-foot reduction. Complete removal of the dam is slated for July through September of 2024.

[gallery link="none" size="medium" ids="13997,13991,13989"]

Reporters from WFMZ 69 News visited the dam removal site to witness the first notch and talk with State Director of TNC in New Jersey Dr. Barbara Brummer, Blairstown Mayor Rob Moorhead, Director of Freshwater Programs at TNC in New Jersey Beth Styler Barry.

“Rivers remember,” said Beth Styler Barry, Director of Freshwater Programs at The Nature Conservancy in New Jersey. “The instant the first notch was made we could already see the Paulins Kill transforming into a more natural shape. Now with six vertical feet taken out, the water that has been stagnant for more than a century is flowing, cooling and aerating, and the natural floodplains are once again exposed and ready to revegetate.”

Click below to watch the full interview:

 

Princeton Hydro, contracted by TNC to provide site investigation, engineering design, permitting, and construction oversight services for the dam removal, has been working closely with Riverlogic-Renova Joint Venture to complete the deconstruction process.

"The first day of dam demolition is always exciting; seeing the river flowing through the breached Paulina Dam after the first notch was very rewarding," said Paulo Rodriguez Heyman, Managing Member of the Riverlogic-Renova Joint Venture, the team leading the construction for the project. "Removing a high-hazard dam is challenging and requires the unique expertise of working in a dynamic river system. We are honored to be part of this collaborative team."


Embracing the Future

The removal of the Paulina Dam stands as one integral facet of a larger restoration plan initiated in 2013, envisioning the removal of multiple dams along the Paulins Kill River. In removing the Paulina Dam, the downstream-most dam on the Paulins Kill, TNC continues to build upon previous watershed-wide restoration activities that includes removing four dams: the Columbia Lake Main and Remnant Dams (2019), the County Line Dam (2021), and now the Paulina Dam.

This multi-pronged effort includes wetland restoration, land protection, and floodplain reforestation—with more than 60,000 trees planted to date throughout 130 acres of floodplain. TNC has executed a 10-year “measures and monitoring” program, which began in 2016, to track conservation successes. This comprehensive effort brings hope for a rejuvenated and thriving river environment.

“The removal of Paulina Dam is not just about dismantling a structure and removing a safety hazard, but paving the way for a renewed riverine landscape, where the flow of life returns to its natural course,” said Geoffrey M. Goll, PE, President of Princeton Hydro and Engineer-of-Record for the Paulina Dam removal project. “As a mission driven firm, we seek out projects that will have a positive ecological impact. We are proud to share that three of the dam removals that we designed on the Paulins Kill - Paulina Dam, Columbia Lake Dam, and County Line Dam - will reconnect 45 miles of mainstem and tributaries for targeted migratory fish species like American shad, American eel, and sea lamprey.”

Resident fish and other aquatic organisms including mussels and trout will also benefit from habitat and water quality improvements, as will birds, pollinators and land-based animals that rely on the river for survival. [caption id="attachment_14026" align="aligncenter" width="697"] Left to Right: Geoffrey M. Goll, PE of Princeton Hydro; Beth Styler Barry of TNC; and Paulo Rodriguez Heyman of Riverlogic-Renova Joint Venture.[/caption]  

The Paulina Dam Removal will be the final step in the TNC-led restoration of the lands and waters of the Paulins Kill.

[embed]https://youtu.be/jo13xTChKLE[/embed]

As the restoration journey continues, it stands as a testament to the power of collaboration, environmental stewardship, and the dedication of communities and organizations striving to preserve and restore our natural landscapes.

Stay tuned for further updates on the incredible transformation of the Paulins Kill River!

[post_title] => Dismantling the Past, Renewing the Future: Removing Paulina Dam on the Paulins Kill River [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => paulina-dam-removal-first-notch [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2023-12-13 18:37:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2023-12-13 18:37:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=13982 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14082 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2023-12-12 12:53:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2023-12-12 12:53:44 [post_content] =>

Princeton Hydro President and Founding Principal Geoffrey M. Goll, P.E. was recently featured on the Native Plants, Healthy Planet Podcast, which is ranked as a Top 20 Nature Apple podcast with 7k+ listeners per month.

Hosts Fran Chismar and Tom Knezick, owners of Pinelands Nursery, invited Geoff on the show to discuss all things dam removal. For Episode 187 titled "The Dam Show" Geoff shared the history of dams and dam removal, the many benefits of removing dams, the challenges around implementing dam removal, recent stories of river restoration success, and helpful resources for anyone looking to learn more.

Click below to listen to the full podcast:  

Princeton Hydro has designed, permitted, and overseen the removal of 84 dams to date. The firm was formed in 1998 with the specific mission of providing integrated ecological and engineering consulting services. Offering expertise in natural resource management, water resources engineering, geotechnical design and investigation, and regulatory compliance, their staff provide a full suite of environmental services throughout the Northeast for the public and private sectors. Princeton Hydro is committed to improving our ecosystems, quality of life, and communities for the better.

[post_title] => LISTEN: Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll, P.E. Discusses Dam Removal on Top 20 Podcast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => listen-princeton-hydro-president-geoff-goll-p-e-discusses-dam-removal-on-top-20-podcast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2023-12-12 12:53:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2023-12-12 12:53:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=14082 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13897 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2023-12-08 09:21:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2023-12-08 09:21:03 [post_content] =>

New Jersey Future, in partnership with Princeton Hydro, launched the New Jersey Stormwater Retrofit Best Management Practices (BMP) Guide. This comprehensive resource stands as a pivotal tool to aid local and county governments, nonprofits, developers, and property owners in retrofitting stormwater infrastructure and integrating sustainable green infrastructure solutions.

Historically, stormwater management measures, often seen in the form of detention basins in residential developments, shopping centers, and corporate complexes, have been designed to control peak flow (i.e., the maximum flow of water during a storm event) and do not necessarily provide a water quality improvement benefit.  A stormwater retrofit aims to modify the existing drainage system to further improve stormwater control and treatment practices. Retrofits can reduce runoff volume, filter out pollutants, increase groundwater recharge, and help mimic pre-development hydrology.

Many stormwater management features were built prior to contemporary regulatory frameworks like the 2021 Green Infrastructure Rule and 2023 Inland Flood Protection Rule. This guide aims to bridge the gap, supporting municipalities in complying with updated MS4 Permit regulations, offering insights into retrofitting existing BMPs, and introducing novel strategies for installing new stormwater BMPs in built-out environments.

Click here to view and download the complete guide.

New Jersey Future will be hosting a public webinar to review this new resource on January 23, 2024 at 12 PM. Register for the webinar here!


What the Guide Offers

Many communities installed stormwater features prior to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s (NJDEP) 2004 Stormwater Management Rule, which means they are outdated and not designed to manage current and future storm events.

The guide's primary aim is to provide invaluable context and guidance, enhancing planning, prioritization, and design efforts for stormwater retrofits. It’s positioned to aid in MS4 Tier A permit compliance, project identification, and design while fostering public-private partnerships aligned with New Jersey Future's mission to promote sensible and equitable growth, redevelopment, and infrastructure investments to foster healthy, strong, resilient communities.

The guide is also intended to supplement existing resources provided by NJDEP as well as New Jersey Future’s Mainstreaming Green Infrastructure Program’s New Jersey Green Infrastructure Municipal Toolkit and New Jersey Developers Green Infrastructure Guide.

"As climate change is exacerbating flooding across the Garden State, it is imperative that we update our existing stormwater infrastructure to both handle the increased quantity of stormwater and filter out pollutants," said Dana Patterson Grear, Director of Marketing and Communications for Princeton Hydro, who helped design the guide and oversee its creation. "This comprehensive stormwater retrofit guide is a treasure trove of insights, strategies, and practical guidance aimed at empowering communities to retrofit outdated stormwater features in order to improve water quality and reduce flooding in their neighorhoods."

The informative and visually engaging guide is organized into eight sections. It delves into the historical context, the journey and evolution of stormwater management in New Jersey; provides real-world examples of successful stormwater retrofit projects across the state; discusses post-construction stormwater system inspection and maintenance protocols to ensure the longevity and effectiveness; and explores a diverse range of stormwater retrofit options, techniques, and strategies tailored for various community landscapes with practical insights and implementation guidance for a spectrum of scenarios.

"The majority of New Jersey’s stormwater management systems were designed and implemented before the MS4 permitting program was created in 2004 and before the NJ Stormwater Management Rule required green infrastructure," said Lindsey Sigmund, PP, AICP, Program Manager for New Jersey Future. "New Jersey Future believes that green infrastructure is a key tool to easing the burden of flooding issues by repairing and restoring missing links in the water cycle. This guide will help New Jersey’s municipalities retrofit their legacy infrastructure, implement green infrastructure solutions, and improve water quality and reduce flooding in their communities."

The toolkit’s conclusion resonates as a call to action, emphasizing the flexibility and adaptability of stormwater retrofits. It encourages proactive engagement with local agencies, universities, soil conservation districts, and watershed associations to initiate these vital transformations. Moreover, it directs stakeholders towards potential funding sources, underscoring the guide's practical applicability.


A Collaborative Triumph

New Jersey Future partnered with Princeton Hydro to create the guide along with input from a team of committed stakeholders, which includes: Fred Akers, Sheila Baker Gujral, Sandra Blick PE, Stephen Elliott, Andrew Filippi PE, Kathy Hale, Jeromie Lange, PE, PP, CME, CFM, Grant Lucking, Gabriel Mahon, PE, Craig McGee, Nicole Miller, Christopher Obropta, PE, Michael Pisauro Jr. Esq., Annie Polkowski, Jaclyn Rhoads PhD, Lucia Osborne, and Fred Stine. A special thank you to Lindsey Sigmund and Patricia Dunkak of New Jersey Future and the entire stakeholder team for your ideas, feedback, and participation. New Jersey Future also gratefully acknowledges the William Penn Foundation for its generous financial support, which made this project possible.

stormwater detention basin planted with native plant species and a few houses in the background  

Founded in 1987, New Jersey Future is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that promotes sensible and equitable growth, redevelopment, and infrastructure investments to foster healthy, strong, resilient communities; protect natural lands and waterways; increase transportation choices beyond cars; provide access to safe, affordable, and aging-friendly neighborhoods; and fuel a strong economy for everyone. Click here to learn more.

Princeton Hydro is a leader in innovative, cost-effective, and environmentally sound stormwater management systems. The preparation of stormwater management plans and design of stormwater management systems for pollutant reduction is an integral part of our projects. Click here to learn more. To explore more of New Jersey's stormwater management resources, click here. [post_title] => Introducing the New Jersey Stormwater Retrofit BMP Guide [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => new-jersey-stormwater-retrofit-best-management-practices-guide [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-01-18 05:01:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-01-18 05:01:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=13897 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14044 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2023-12-04 01:07:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2023-12-04 01:07:37 [post_content] =>

Mark Gallagher, Vice President of Princeton Hydro, has been appointed to the Friends of Abbott Marshland Advisory Board.


About the Friends of Abbott Marshland

The Abbott Marshlands is composed of 3,000 acres of wetlands and uplands located on the western edge of central New Jersey in Mercer County. It is the northernmost freshwater tidal marsh on the Delaware River and contains valuable habitat for many rare species like River Otter, American Eel, Bald Eagle, and various species of wading birds.

[caption id="attachment_14051" align="aligncenter" width="743"] Aerial drone imagery taken in late summer of 2019 above Roebling Park in Abbott Marshlands.[/caption]  

Unfortunately, this ecosystem has faced challenges partially due to the invasion of the aggressive Common Reed (Phragmites australis), causing substantial habitat loss and degradation. In response to these challenges, the Friends for the Abbott Marshlands have dedicated themselves to enhancing appreciation and protection of this precious ecosystem. Their mission focuses on engaging and inspiring a diverse community to experience the unique nature and history of the Abbott Marshlands. Their priorities involve expanding community involvement, advancing educational programs through the Tulpehaking Nature Center, enhancing organizational capacity, and working in cooperative stewardship efforts.

Since its inception, the Friends for the Abbott Marshlands have played a pivotal role in advocating for the preservation and stewardship of the marshlands. They've organized various educational programs, symposia, nature walks, and juried photography shows to raise awareness and encourage stewardship of this unique ecosystem. The Friends for the Abbott Marshlands Advisory Board meets periodically to advise on program design and execution, fundraising, and engagement in any and all activities related to the preservation of the Abbott Marshlands.

The area is named "Abbott Marshlands" in recognition of the important archaeological legacy of the marsh and of Charles Conrad Abbott, a 19th and early 20th century archaeologist and naturalist, who lived on the bluffs near the marsh and who wrote extensively about it.


Princeton Hydro's Work at Abbott Marshlands

Recognizing the urgent need to restore the Abbott Marshlands, Mercer County contracted Princeton Hydro to spearhead a multi-year, multi-phased restoration initiative. The project aimed at reducing and controlling the invasive Phragmites australis while increasing the presence of native marsh vegetation.

Princeton Hydro conducted a Floristic Quality Assessment to identify invasive areas and to establish a baseline for the restoration efforts. The team also performed hydrologic monitoring to understand tidal stage elevations. From 2018-2019, herbicide treatments were consistently conducted to combat the invasive phragmites. In the winter of 2019-2020, 46 acres of phragmites was cut and rolled with our Marsh Master using a modified steel roller attachment. The phragmites was then removed by raking, which in turn exposed the marsh plain’s substrate and seedbank to promote germination of the native marsh vegetation. Extensive areas of wild rice, mud plantain, broad leaved cattail, water purslane, pickerelweed, and arrow arum colonized the areas formerly overtaken by phragmites within the first growing season after the marsh plain was exposed. The project also includes the creation of 500 linear feet of living shoreline, a freshwater mussel bed, and a sustainable boat launch.

[gallery link="none" columns="4" ids="14049,7137,14058,14055"] [caption id="attachment_14053" align="aligncenter" width="749"] Drone imagery from Winter 2020 after herbicide treatment and rolling and cutting of Phragmites at Roebling Park.[/caption]

This comprehensive and collaborative restoration effort not only targets invasive species but also focused on enhancing biodiversity; improving recreational opportunities such as kayaking and bird watching; enhancing the overall visitor experience at John A. Roebling Memorial Park, which is part of Abbott Marshlands; and creating opportunities for community engagement and appreciation of this natural treasure.


Learn More

Click here to learn how you can get involved with supporting and participating in initiatives aimed at protecting and cherishing the Marshlands for generations to come. To take a deeper dive into Princeton Hydro's work at Abbott Marshlands, click here.

A founding partner of Princeton Hydro, Mark is a pioneer in the field of restoration ecology, and helped get the conservation science movement off the ground in the 1980s. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Moravian College and Master of Science in Plant Ecology from Rutgers University. For more than two decades, Mark has overseen wetland and terrestrial ecology projects at Princeton Hydro, including many complex restoration projects that require unique solutions.

Mark, along with Princeton Hydro team members Dana Patterson and Michael Rehman, CERP, PWS and representatives from Mercer County and Friends of the Abbott Marshlands, led a educational course and field exploration of the Abbott Marshlands as part of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) annual Youth Inclusion Initiative. Learn more here.

      [post_title] => Mark Gallagher Appointed to Friends of Abbott Marshland Advisory Board [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => mark-gallagher-appointed-to-friends-of-abbott-marshland-advisory-board [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-01-18 03:26:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-01-18 03:26:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=14044 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13963 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2023-11-27 12:03:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2023-11-27 12:03:16 [post_content] =>

The removal of Beatty's Mill Dam stands as a pivotal moment in the conservation efforts along the Musconetcong River. This critical initiative, spearheaded by the Musconetcong Watershed Association (MWA), Washington Township, and the Town of Hackettstown in collaboration with Princeton Hydro and RiverLogic Solutions, marks a significant stride towards rejuvenating the river's natural ecosystem and addressing long-standing concerns regarding flood mitigation and habitat preservation.

[caption id="attachment_13929" align="aligncenter" width="763"] Photo taken November 12, 2023.[/caption]

History of the Beatty’s Mill Dam

Beatty's Mill Dam straddles the border between Warren and Morris Counties in Hackettstown and Washington Township, New Jersey.  It is a 6-foot-high stone masonry, concrete, and earth embankment dam that was built in the 18th century and has been non-functional for decades.

[caption id="attachment_13968" align="alignright" width="419"] Photo of Beatty's Mill Dam (pre-removal) taken from upstream with the East Avenue bridge in the background[/caption]

Beatty’s Mill Dam is a low-head dam, which means it was not built to protect communities from flooding and can make flooding worse in some cases. Hackettstown and Washington Township are also more susceptible to flooding and erosion due to the high percentage of impervious surfaces, like roads and parking lots, which cause higher flows of stormwater runoff.

A dam safety report from 1981 shows that the dam had been breached on the eastern end. The breach caused a hairpin turn where the river is diverted sharply to the east then back to the west before flowing under the East Avenue bridge. Over time, this created erosive conditions at the upstream side of the bridge and roadbed, threatening the integrity of the infrastructure. Additionally, extensive alteration of the floodplain occurred upstream of the dam, including an elevated earthen berm along the left bank, and general land disturbance in both upland and wetlands.

The removal of the dam not only addresses the structural concerns but also holds the promise of extensive environmental improvements. By eradicating barriers to the Musconetcong River's natural flow, restoring the floodplain, and implementing strategies to curb stormwater runoff, this initiative aims to mitigate flooding, promote water quality, and foster a thriving habitat for aquatic organisms including indigenous species like the Eastern Brook Trout and American Eel.


Removing the Dam

With funding from the Highlands Council, Princeton Hydro was contracted in 2019 by Washington Township to complete a water quality assessment, hydrologic and hydraulic analysis, and functional value stream assessment of reaches of the Musconetcong River that encompassed the Beatty’s Mill site (and the downstream Newburgh Dam site). Following the New Jersey Highlands Water Protection and Planning Council guidance, Princeton Hydro assessed and rated the river reaches on five functional values: channel integrity, habitat, water quality, temperature moderation, and public use. The Beatty’s Mill Dam, floodplain encroachment, narrow riparian buffers, and non-native riparian vegetation were the primary sources of impact to the functional values.

Subsequently, Princeton Hydro was contracted by MWA to complete a site investigation, wetland delineation, topographic survey, and preliminary (60%) engineering design for dam removal. Preliminary plans were reviewed by Washington Township and the Town of Hackettstown. In 2023, Princeton Hydro completed the final engineering design, hydrologic and hydraulic modeling, and permitting for the removal of Beatty’s Mill Dam and restoration of the floodplain and provided engineering oversight during construction.

[gallery link="none" columns="2" ids="13938,13939"]  

The removal of Beatty’s Mill Dam was officially completed the week of November 13, 2023!

Princeton Hydro assisted in the removal and restoration, providing engineering plans and project management support. With the dam removed, 2.5 acres of flood plain have been restored; 0.15 mile of stream bank have been stabilized; 0.15 mile of stream bed has been rehabilitated; and total suspended solids in the water have been reduced by 20%.

Michael Allers, Princeton Hydro Restoration Ecologist and licensed FAA-Certified Commercial Drone Pilot, captured these aerial images of the completed project site:

[gallery link="none" columns="4" ids="13934,13933,13932,13931"]

It is projected that there will be significant improvement to the five aforementioned functional values, increased fish passage, enhanced hydraulic conditions at the East Avenue bridge as well as improvements to the river’s pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen levels.

Removing the dam also supports conformance with the Highlands Regional Master Plan, which is intended to protect, preserve, and enhance precious water resources within the Highlands Region. The project work also includes the restoration of the damaged floodplain, stream banks, and stream bed by planting trees, building up the banks with rocks, and allowing the river to return to its natural flowing channel.


Looking Ahead

This project’s significance extends beyond the immediate environmental impact. Funding from sources like the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation under the Delaware Watershed Conservation Fund and New Jersey’s Highlands Council, along with corporate contributions, underscores its potential to serve as a model for similar restoration projects across the Delaware River Watershed. Such initiatives not only enhance aquatic habitats but also bolster community resilience against flooding and elevate public awareness regarding watershed conservation.

The vision for this restoration effort reflects a collective commitment to revitalize river ecosystems, not just for the immediate region but as part of a broader strategy for conservation. The Beatty's Mill Dam marks the MWA's sixth dam removed on the Musconetcong River since 2008, but it is far from the last. This project aims to set a precedent for sustainable river management and ecosystem preservation.

The removal of Beatty's Mill Dam represents a milestone in the ongoing efforts to restore the Musconetcong River's ecological balance and underscores the collaborative spirit between MWA, local municipalities, various stakeholders, and Princeton Hydro. It serves as a testament to the potential of concerted conservation endeavors to restore the vitality of our waterways and safeguard the natural heritage for generations to come.


The Musconetcong Watershed Association (MWA) is an independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting and improving the quality of the Musconetcong River and its watershed, including its natural and cultural resources. Members of the organization are part of a network of individuals, families, and companies that care about the Musconetcong River and its watershed, and are dedicated to improving the watershed resources through public education and awareness programs, river water quality monitoring, promotion of sustainable land management practices, and community involvement. Click here to learn more.

Princeton Hydro has been working with MWA in the areas of river restoration, dam removal, and engineering consulting since 2003. Click here to read our Client Spotlight blog featuring MWA’s Executive Director Cindy Joerger and Communications Coordinator Karen Doerfer.

[post_title] => Conservation Spotlight: Beatty's Mill Dam Removal is Complete [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => beattys-mill-dam-removal [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-01-18 05:10:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-01-18 05:10:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=13963 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 11 [current_post] => -1 [before_loop] => 1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14482 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2024-02-19 14:53:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2024-02-19 14:53:47 [post_content] =>

In Warrington Township, Pennsylvania, an innovative ecological uplift initiative is underway at Lion's Pride Park. This project aims to transform a stagnant pond, overrun with invasive species and plagued by water quality issues, into a thriving wetland mosaic. This endeavor, a collaborative effort between Warrington Township, Princeton Hydro, and other stakeholders, promises to not only revitalize the natural environment but also enhance community access and education within the park.

[caption id="attachment_14494" align="aligncenter" width="802"] Historical photo of Lion's Pride Park pond in Warrington Township, PA.[/caption]

Restoration Overview and Community Impact

Spanning 47 acres, Lion's Pride Park serves as a green oasis within the Township, offering a range of recreational and educational opportunities for visitors of all ages and abilities.

The pond within the park was in urgent need of restoration - heavy storm events caused the pond to overflow, which created flooding conditions in the park. The local native biodiversity was being threatened by nusiance and invasive species like water chestnut (Trapa natans). The photos below were taken in April 2020.

[gallery link="none" columns="2" size="medium" ids="14485,14486"]  

Princeton Hydro began in 2020 with site investigation and field surveys, including:

  1. Bathymetric assessment to map water depth and accumulated unconsolidated sediment in the pond
  2. Sediment sampling to facilitate options for the potential reuse of the sediment on site and the selection of native vegetation for the various habitats being created
  3. Wetland delineation to identify existing wetland boundaries within and adjacent to the project site and discern the extent of jurisdictional impacts related to the proposed activities.

The most substantial component for the restoration project was the conversion of the existing pond to an emergent wetland complex to provide habitat for a wide variety of native species. Using the completed existing conditions reports and surveys, Princeton Hydro prepared the conceptual design plan that informed the entire restoration process.

Princeton Hydro Regulatory Compliance & Wildlife Surveys Project Manager Emily Bjorhus, PWS spearheaded the regulatory program for the project, navigating approvals from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the Bucks County Conservation District. The permitting process laid the groundwork for the smooth implementation of this design-build restoration project.

[gallery link="none" columns="2" size="medium" ids="14253,14244"] [caption id="attachment_14493" align="aligncenter" width="1227"] October 2023[/caption]  

The restoration work encompassed various stages, from earthwork and vegetation planting to the installation of ADA-compliant pathways and informational signage. Some of the key project elements, include:

Channel stabilization: Stabilizing the channels within the park, addressing erosion issues, enhancing water flow dynamics, and promoting the establishment of diverse aquatic habitats.

Berm construction: Installing berms to enhance wetland habitat and promote natural floodplain connectivity, contributing to the resilience of the ecosystem to flooding events.

Native vegetation planting: Reintroducing native wetland and riparian plant species to enhance biodiversity and create habitat corridors for wildlife within the park. Planting is expected to take place in the Spring.

Interpretive signage installation: Placing educational signage throughout the park to inform visitors about the ecological significance of the restoration project and the importance of wetland conservation.

Boardwalk installation: Constructing a 6-foot-wide ADA-compliant boardwalk that spanned approximately 230 linear feet, providing visitors with accessible pathways to explore the restored wetland areas.

[gallery columns="2" link="none" size="medium" ids="14491,14490,14492,14487"]

Through these strategic interventions, the Lion's Pride Park Ecological Restoration Project aims to not only rejuvenate the ecological integrity of landscape but also enrich the recreational and educational experiences of the community. The project, which is slated for 100% completion this Spring, will totally transform the landscape into a diverse wetland complex that fosters native wildlife habitat, mitigates water quality concerns, reduces nonpoint source pollutants discharged to downstream waters, and provides accessible pathways and observation platforms so all community members may enjoy and learn from this restored aquatic setting.

The reclaimed wetland provides additional bird and pollinator habitat and offer visitors a diverse ecosystem to learn from within the park. By fostering a deeper connection to nature and promoting environmental stewardship, this project exemplifies the transformative power of ecological restoration in creating vibrant, sustainable communities.


Upcoming Presentation

[caption id="attachment_13487" align="alignleft" width="247"] Emily out field performing a wetland delineation.[/caption]

On March 23, at the 2024 Watershed Congress hosted by the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, Emily will be presenting about the Lion's Pride Park Ecological Restoration Project. Her presentation will offer insights into the regulatory approval and permitting process, takes a deeper dive into the restoration strategies, and showcases the ecological significance of the project. Click here to learn more about the 2024 Watershed Congress.

Emily, a certified Professional Wetland Scientist, is a Project Manager that specializes in environmental regulatory compliance, ecological services and wildlife surveys. She leads federal, state and local environmental permitting processes, NEPA compliance and documentation, Endangered Species Act Section 7 consultations, and Clean Water Act Section 404(b)1 analyses.


The Lion's Pride Park Ecological Restoration Project exemplifies a holistic approach to environmental conservation, community engagement, and public recreation. By repurposing a neglected pond into a vibrant wetland mosaic, this initiative embodies the principles of ecological resilience and inclusive urban planning, and celebrates the transformative potential of ecological uplift projects in fostering healthier, more vibrant communities.

Please stay tuned to our blog for more project updates once planting is completed this Spring. Click here to read more about Princeton Hydro’s robust natural resource management and restoration services.

[post_title] => Restoring Balance: Converting a Pond into a Wetland Mosaic at Lion’s Pride Park [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => restoring-balance-converting-a-pond-into-a-wetland-mosaic-at-lions-pride-park [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2024-02-20 12:32:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2024-02-20 12:32:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=14482 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 360 [max_num_pages] => 33 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => 1 [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => 1 [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => d62d2cbe592bbb144bf43b0bfc30813d [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [allow_query_attachment_by_filename:protected] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

Blog

archive
 
Topics
Select Topics
Posted on February 19, 2024

Restoring Balance: Converting a Pond into a Wetland Mosaic at Lion’s Pride Park

Popular Topics

Company News

Engineering

Environmental Action

Environmental Services

Flood Mitigation

Invasive Species Management

Lake and Pond Management

Natural Resource Management

Stormwater Management

Stream Restoration