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The Princeton Hydro team is proud to be participating in and sponsoring a variety events focused on conserving, restoring, and protecting our precious water resources. In this edition of our Events Spotlight, we provide a snapshot of upcoming events this Fall and information on how to get involved:

 

October 5: "Facebook Live" Q&A with Princeton Hydro HAB Experts

Do you have questions about harmful algal blooms? Now is your chance to get answers! Join us on Tuesday, October 5 at 6:30 PM EDT for a "Facebook Live" conversation with two of Princeton Hydro's HAB experts, Dr. Fred Lubnow and Mike Hartshorne. Participants will get an overview of HABs and engage in a live Q&A session. You can submit a question by joining the live feed and typing in the comments. Get more info and register.

October 11-15: SAME MEGA Maryland - Small/Minority Business Conference for A/E/C

This year’s conference features a mix of in-person and virtual events,  including informative keynotes; local, State, and Federal agency panels; networking sessions; training workshops; webinars; and two special field trip activities. Princeton Hydro is honored to sponsor MEGA Maryland, which is seen as the premier event for the architecture, engineering, and construction industry. Our Director of Marketing, Dana Patterson, will be exhibiting at the in-person portion of the event. Get more info and register.

October 13: NJ Invasive Species Strike Team Professional Conference

Presented by the Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space and hosted by Duke Farms, the 2021 Annual New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team Conference will focus on the use of prescribed burning to combat invasive species. Princeton Hydro is sponsoring this event, which is being held outdoors under a tent. We look forward to seeing you there in October! Get more info and register

October 14: Linden Blue Acres Tour - Green Infrastructure & Floodplain Restoration

Join NJ-AWRA and Princeton Hydro for a tour of the Award-Winning Linden Blue Acres Green Infrastructure & Floodplain Restoration Project. This project set the precedent for enhancing ecological and floodplain function on flood-prone properties acquired by the NJDEP Blue Acres Program. This event is approved for one (1) credit hour of continuing education for Certified Floodplain Managers. Get more info and register

 

October 18: Fall 2021 Regional Lake Communities Symposium 

Western Connecticut State University presents its Fall 2021 Regional Lake Communities Symposium “Fall Science at Night Virtual Seminar Series." The seminar, titled “Threats to Our Lakes: Beyond Aquatic Invasive Plants,” welcomes members of the public, students, and scientists to participate in a variety of workshops focused on local lake conservation and management. Princeton Hydro’s Director of Aquatic Programs Dr. Fred Lubnow is presenting “The Lake Hopatcong (NJ) Story.” Get more info and register

October 19-20: 2021 Living Shorelines Tech Transfer Workshop

Join Restore America's Estuaries, American Littoral Society, NJDEP and the Chesapeake Bay and New Jersey field offices of the USFWS for the Living Shorelines & Nature - Based Methods Tech Transfer Workshop. The workshop, which is being held both virtually and in-person at the Grand Hotel in Cape May, NJ, features field trips to local restoration projects, workshops, networking events, and an exhibit hall. Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor of the event and our Director of Marketing & Communications Dana Patterson is exhibiting! Please note: Attendees must provide confirmation of COVID-19 vaccination as part of registration. Get more info and register

October 19-22: ANJEC 2021 Environmental Congress

We are thrilled to sponsor the 48th Annual Environmental Congress, which is being held in an all-virtual Zoom format. Each day includes a variety of workshop sessions on topics like stormwater management, environmental justice advancement in New Jersey, and local climate action. The closing session on Friday includes entertainment by Musician Maxwell Kofi Donkor. Get more info and register

October 26: Colorado Lake & Reservoir Management Association Conference

Princeton Hydro’s Senior Project Manager and Senior Aquatic Ecologist Chris L. Mikolajczyk, CLM, is giving a Halloween-inspired presentation titled "In Celebration of All Hallows Eve: Reflections of a Study on One of the Spookiest Lakes in the U.S." This free, one-day conference will be held virtually and is open to he public. Get more info and register

October 26-28: NJ Association for Floodplain Management 16th Annual Conference

The 16th Annual Conference will be held at the Hard Rock Casino Hotel in Atlantic City. With more than 40 speakers lined-up, conference workshops will focus on a robust array of floodplain management topics, including flood hazard identification and mapping; flood hazard mitigation; technical assistance and training; and natural resource protection and enhancement. Princeton Hydro is happy to sponsor this event and our Director of Marketing, Dana Patterson, will be attending and exhibiting. Get more info and register

 

November 1-4 and 8-11: Coastal & Estuarine Research Federation Biennial Conference

The theme of the 26th Biennial CERF Conference is "CERF at 50: Celebrating Our Past, Charting Our Future." The virtual, eight-day conference aims to connect science and society in the collective goals of preserving coastal and estuarine habitats, resources, and heritage. The conference, which is expected to draw 1,300+ scientists and researchers from all over the world, includes a virtual exhibit hall, networking events, a film festival and a variety of workshops. Johnny Quispe, Princeton Hydro Natural Resources Project Manager, is presenting on November 3 at 10 AM as part of the session on "Transdisciplinary design and adaptation for sustainable, resilient urban coastlines: realizing triple-bottom line outcomes." His presentation features The South River Ecosystem Restoration & Flood Resiliency Enhancement Project. Get more info and register.

November 3-5: Fifth Annual Watershed Conference

The Watershed Institute’s 5th Annual Watershed Conference will be in a hybrid format with participants selecting socially distanced, in-person sessions at the Watershed Center and Reserve or choosing to attend virtually if they prefer. Princeton Hydro is sponsoring the event and leading two workshops. Our Director of Green Infrastructure and Stormwater Management, Dr. Clay Emerson, P.E., CFM, along with Kathy Hale, Principal Watershed Protection Specialist, NJ Water Supply Authority, is presenting on “Naturalizing Detention Basins.” And, Vice President Mark Gallagher, along with Patrick Ryan of the NJDEP, is presenting on "Understanding Permit Requirements for Conservation Activities." Get more info and register.

November 6-10: American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting 2021

Science professionals from throughout the world will come together for this hybrid-format event offering both virtual and in-person participation opportunities. This year's conference, themed “Investing in People, Habitat, and Science” includes scientific sessions, a poster hall, a tradeshow and exhibits, and a variety of Plenary Speakers. Princeton Hydro President Geoffrey Goll is presenting on, "Dam Removal in History, Current State of Removal, and Future Needs." Get more info and register

 

November 9-10: Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference

The Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference is coordinated by the New Jersey Highlands Coalition, with the support of partner organizations in the Highlands and Ridge & Valley regions of New Jersey. Together, these groups are collaborating to restore water quality under the four-state Delaware River Watershed Initiative. The 2021 Conference, held in an online-only format, will focus on three key themes, "Sustainability & Economic Development," "Land Use Planning & Conservation," and "Water Quality Monitoring & Management." The conference is free and open to the public, and includes a variety of presentations, workshops and a virtual exhibitor hall. Princeton Hydro is exhibiting.  Get more info and register

November 15-18: North American Lake Management Society 41st International Symposium

Princeton Hydro is sponsoring the NALMS 2021 International Symposium, which will be held virtually. The event consists of multiple panels and discussions focused on the value of water for economics, ecology, and culture. Senior Project Manager Christopher L. Mikolajczyk, CLM is giving a presentation titled "A Public-Private Approach to Lake and Watershed Management in the Highlands Region of New Jersey.” Our Director of Aquatic Resources, Dr. Fred Lubnow, is presenting on "Monitoring and Management of HABs in New Jersey Waterbodies From 2019 to 2021." Get more info and register

November 21: Camden Environmental Summit

This one-day virtual summit, hosted by the The Camden Collaborative Initiative, focuses on preserving the environment in the city of Camden. Princeton Hydro is proud to sponsor this event, which is free for Camden residents and students, and $25 for all other attendees. Get more info and register.

 

Stay Tuned for More! 

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Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are rapid, large overgrowths of cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, aren’t actually algae, they are prokaryotes, single-celled aquatic organisms that are closely related to bacteria and can photosynthesize like algae. These microorganisms are a natural part of aquatic ecosystems, but, under the right conditions (primarily heavy rains, followed by hot, sunny days), these organisms can rapidly increase to form cyanobacteria blooms, also known as HABs.

HABs can have severe impacts on waterbodies causing significant water quality issues and often forming a visible and sometimes odorous scum on the surface of the water. HABs negatively impact economic health, especially for communities dependent on the income of jobs and tourism generated through their local lakes and waterways. And, HABs can produce toxins that are incredibly harmful (even deadly) to humans, aquatic organisms and animals, including beloved pets, wildlife, and livestock. 


How HABs Affect Animals

The health impacts and symptoms can vary depending on the size and type of animal, how an animal is exposed to the cyanobacteria, how long they were exposed, which type of toxin was present, and how much toxin was present.

Swimming in waters with even low concentrations of cyanotoxin may cause skin rashes, ear/throat infections, and gastrointestinal distress. When ingested, the impacts can be even more severe. The toxins can cause liver, kidney, and nerve damage, and, at high concentrations, cyanotoxins can be lethal.

"Aeration System" by Chris Mikolajczyk, Photo Contest Submission

Animals are often the first effected, in part because they are more likely to swim in or drink from bodies of water that contain cyanobacteria. Dogs are among the most vulnerable victims because they will swallow contaminated water when playing in waterbodies where the existence of toxins may not be noticed. Livestock and wild animals are also susceptible to injecting toxins when drinking from contaminated water sources. 

Earlier this year, researchers released a study concluding that a neurotoxin generated by cyanobacteria is responsible for the deaths of eagles and waterbirds. After about 30 years of research, scientists were able to determine that cyanotoxins are the cause of a wildlife disease called vacuolar myelinopathy, a fatal neurological disease that affects various waterbirds, raptors, and, most commonly, bald eagles.


Common Signs of Cyanobacterial Poisoning

Signs of cyanobacterial poisoning can occur within 30 minutes to a few hours after exposure. In severe cases, animals, specifically dogs, can show signs of cyanobacterial poisoning within a few minutes. Common symptoms can include:

  • Elevated heart rate and difficulty breathing
  • Excessive salivation or drooling
  • Disorientation, inactivity, or depression
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Skin, eye, nose, or throat irritation
  • Neurological symptoms, including muscle weakness, dizziness, stumbling, seizures, or paralysis

Seek veterinary care immediately and/or call the Poison Control Center if you think your pet or livestock may have symptoms caused by harmful algae, cyanobacteria, or their toxins.

24-Hour Pet Poison Hotlines
Animal Poison Control Center: (800)-213-6680
ASPCA: (888) 426-4435.


Protect Yourself & Your Pets

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation recently released the following safety guidance related to animals and HABs:

“Keep animals, your pets, or livestock out of any surface scums or heavily discolored water, or  rinse them with clean water if they are exposed to blooms. HABs can stick to and become concentrated on animal fur, creating a health risk when the animal grooms itself. This is particularly important because HABs may release a fast-acting nerve toxin that can be dangerous for pets, especially dogs that swim in blooms…”

2021. NYSDEC. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) Additional Information.

There are more steps you can take to protect yourself and your pets from getting sick from harmful algae and cyanobacteria:

  • Before you go swimming or fishing, check for advisories.
  • Do not swim, boat, fish or play in water that: smells bad; looks discolored; has foam, scum, mats, or paint-like streaks on the surface; or has dead fish or other animals washed up on its shore or beach
  • If you see a bloom or what you suspect may be a bloom, keep yourself, pets, and livestock away from the water. 
  • The CDC says, “When in Doubt, Stay Out”

A great tool for tracking and reporting HABs is the bloomWatch App. You can use bloomWatch to locate HABs and you can report potential HAB sightings to your local officials. Get more info here. Additionally, the NYDEC’s New York HAB System displays the location of current freshwater (non-marine) HABs throughout New York State; check it out here.

For additional HABs-related health and safety guidance, visit NYSDEC's Information about Harmful Algal Blooms webpage

A great tool for tracking and reporting HABs is the bloomWatch App. You can use bloomWatch to locate HABs and you can report potential HAB sightings to your local officials. Get more info here. Additionally, the NYDEC’s New York HAB System displays the location of current freshwater (non-marine) HABs throughout New York State; check it out here.

For additional HABs-related health and safety guidance, visit NYSDEC's Information about Harmful Algal Blooms webpage


To learn about some of the things Princeton Hydro is doing to prevent, mitigate, and treat HABs, visit our recent blog: 

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Princeton Hydro Natural Resource Management Project Manager Johnny Quispe worked with a group of experts to author a peer-reviewed study, titled “A Socio-ecological Imperative for Broadening Participation in Coastal and Estuarine Research and Management.” This compelling and important study was recently published as an open-source article in Estuaries and Coasts, the journal of the Coastal Estuarine Research Federation.

In the article, the authors put the spotlight on the lack of diversity in scientific disciplines, and describe the urgency of building a diverse and inclusive workforce in coastal and estuarine science specifically. The study provides overview of this inequity and identifies how a scientific society can and must catalyze representational, structural, and interactional diversity to achieve greater inclusion. The study states:

Needed changes go beyond representational diversity and require an intentional commitment to build capacity through inclusivity and community engagement by supporting anti-racist policies and actions… Our vision couples the importance of workforce representation for the communities we serve with an effort to use inclusion and diversity initiatives as a mechanism for social justice and to address institutionalized racism, which is deeply rooted in the geosciences… Professional societies, as institutional actors, can play a key role in dismantling racism and broadening participation in science… We contend that scientific societies can be natural agents of positive change in this regard and that they have an obligation to do so… Such work is not only long overdue and essential to estuarine and coastal science and management, but it is also a moral imperative.

[caption id="attachment_8890" align="aligncenter" width="2000"]A Socio-ecological Imperative for Broadening Participation in Coastal and Estuarine Research and Management The above shows U.S. county averages of racial and ethnic composition in  coastal vs. non-coastal areas (Chart A) and shoreline vs. non-shoreline areas (Chart B). Data source: US Census Bureau (2019) and NOAA (2021). [/caption]

Also illustrated in the study is the disparity between the racial and ethnic composition of coastal and shoreline areas and the racial and ethnic characteristics of ocean science graduates. Nearly across the board, average populations of Blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans are higher (sometimes substantially) in U.S. coastal and shoreline areas than non-coastal and non-shoreline areas. Yet, STEM degree programs and occupations in the U.S. and globally continue to significantly lack demographic diversity. Furthermore, as the study states:

“Without a marked increase in the racial and ethnic diversity of students obtaining geoscience degrees, all science fields including coastal sciences risk losing the capacity to do the best science and to design the best policy. By championing equitable representation of underrepresented groups in geosciences, coastal communities will better innovate in the face of a changing climate and thus a changing coastal system.

Estuaries and Coasts published the study as an open-source article, which means it’s available to read in-full for anyone interested in taking a deeper dive into this important subject matter. Click here to read the full article.

The following individuals worked together to author the study:
  • J. Quispe, Princeton Hydro and Rutgers University Graduate Program in Ecology and Evolution
  • L.A. Harris, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
  • T. Grayson, US Environmental Protection Agency
  • H.A. Neckles, US Geological Survey, Eastern Ecological Science Center
  • C.T. Emrich, School of Public Administration, National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, University of Central Florida
  • K.A. Lewis, Department of Biology, National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, University of Central Florida
  • K.W. Grimes, Center for Marine & Environmental Studies, University of the Virgin Islands
  • S. Williamson, National Association of Counties
  • C. Garza, School of Natural Sciences, California State University, Monterey Bay
  • C.R. Whitcraft, Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach
  • J. Beseres Pollack, Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi
  • D.M. Talley, Environmental and Ocean Sciences, University of San Diego
  • B. Fertig, Ronin Institute for Independent Scholarship
  • C.M. Palinkas, Horn Point Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
  • S. Park, Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation
  • J.M.P. Vaudrey, Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut
  • A.M. Fitzgerald, Biology Department, New Jersey City University

Johnny Quispe, Princeton Hydro’s Natural Resource Management Project Manager, is a Ph.D. candidate at Rutgers University’s Graduate Program of Ecology and Evolution completing his dissertation on the effects of sea level rise on coastal ecosystems and communities. At Princeton Hydro, Johnny integrates social, economic, engineering, and natural systems into his projects to make coastal communities more resilient to natural disasters and climate change. 

To learn more about Johnny Quispe, go here. And, for more information about Princeton Hydro's Natural Resource Management services, click here.

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Happy Earth Day! It's important that we all do our part to honor this important occasion and promote climate action. We've put together a list of fun ideas and helpful tips to celebrate Earth Day 2021 safely and responsibly:


Get Outside, Safely

Illustration by New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

Getting outdoors is a great way to celebrate Earth Day, and it can boost your mental and physical health. While remaining mindful about maintaining safe social distancing practices, we can still get outside to take advantage of the spring weather and enjoy the outdoor adventures in our own backyards.

Earth Month Scavenger Hunt from Eco Promotional Products For more tips on social distancing while visiting parks and natural areas, check out this helpful info from NJ Department of Environmental Protection.

Clean-up Your Neighborhood

Photo: Santiago Mejia, The Chronicle

Although large volunteer clean-up events are postponed due to social distancing guidelines, we can still do our part to pick-up trash and protect our local waterways. Here are a few ideas:

  • When you go outside for an afternoon walk, bring gloves and a garbage bag so you can pick up any trash you see along the way.

  • Check the storm drains in your neighborhood and remove and discard any debris that you find. Get started by reading these DIY tips!


Get Crafting & Birdwatching

Here are some simple DIY crafting ideas to help you pass the time and improve your backyard birdwatching.

  • Orange Feeder: Oranges are a tasty, energizing snack loved by several bird species, especially the Baltimore Oriole. Follow a few simple steps for building an orange feeder, and then sit back and enjoy your backyard bird watching experience!

  • Hummingbird Nectar: Bring more hummingbirds to your backyard this season in a few easy steps! By filling your feeder with this DIY delight, you can watch these beautiful little birds feed and flitter all day.

  • Heart-Shaped Feeder: Show your local songbirds some love with this DIY heart-shaped bird feeder. It makes a charming decoration for your backyard trees.

If you're interested in taking your birdwatching adventures beyond your backyard, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation offers a variety of information and online resources to help you do so.

Get your Yard Spring-Ready

Residential homes and neighborhoods can benefit from the implementation of green infrastructure in more ways than many people realize. Planting native flower beds reduces runoff and attracts important pollinators.
  • Reduce Invasives, Plant Natives: Tulips will soon be emerging from the ground, buds blossoming on trees and, unfortunately, invasive plant species will too begin their annual growing cycle. Invasive species create major impacts on ecosystems near and far, but we can all do our part to reduce the spread. To learn more about aquatic invasive species and how to address them, check out our blog.

  • Prepare your Pond for Spring: If you have a pond on your property, check out these six steps for taking your pond out of hibernation mode, sprucing it up for Spring, and ensuring it remains healthy all year long.


Be Water-Wise

Now that we’re all spending more time at home, this is a great opportunity to incorporate better water-conservation practices into our daily lives.

  • Reduce water waste by checking for leaks that have been caused by winter freeze. Check garden hose spigots and sprinklers, and replace valves, washers and other components as necessary.

  • Install a rain barrel and use the captured rainfall to irrigate flower beds. This is another fun and inexpensive way to reduce runoff and save water. You can order a rain barrel online or search online for DIY rain barrel ideas. Remember to cover your barrels to keep mosquitoes at bay.

  • Go here for more water conservation tips.


Let’s Talk Toilets

According to the USEPA, toilets account for more water use than any other water-consuming product in your home. Toilets are estimated to be responsible for upwards of 30% of household water consumption. Additionally, flushing anything besides toilet paper has major negative impacts on the environment.

  • Eliminate toilet leaks: 79% of water lost in the home is through toilet leaks. Often silent, these leaks can waste up to 300 gallons of water per day. Check for leaks using food coloring. Replace the refill valve or flush valve when necessary.

  • Flush Responsibly: NY State Department of Environmental Conservation recently issued an email requesting more responsible flushing habits. As a reminder, disinfectant wipes, diapers, baby wipes, personal hygiene products, and any paper products other than toilet paper should never be flushed! These materials create significant damage to sewer systems, water treatment plants, and septic systems. Learn more.


Go Digital

Earth Day 2020, which also happens to be the 50th anniversary, will now be the first-ever Digital Earth Day. Here are a few ways to celebrate from the safety of your home:

  • Participate in a global Citizen Science effort! Download the Earth Challenge 2021 smart phone app to submit observations of the environment around your home. The data you submit will be validated, and the resulting database—of over one billion data points—will be displayed on a public map for researchers to use.

  • Sign-up to be a part of the largest environment mobilization in history: EarthDay.org’s EARTHRISE initiative, which includes social media campaigns, online teach-ins, performances, and more. Find a digital Earth Day Event!

Inspire others to celebrate Earth Day 2021 responsibly by documenting your activities and sharing on social media with hashtags: #EarthDay, #EarthDay2021, #EARTHRISE, and #RecreateLocal. To read about Princeton Hydro's past Earth Day celebrations, go here.

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Earth Day and Arbor Day are right around the corner, and we've got a variety of upcoming events we're excited about. The Princeton Hydro team is pitching in at Westchester County's largest volunteer effort of 2021; presenting at virtual conferences; leading a professional education course on dam removal; and participating in events that celebrate environmental stewardship. Here's a snapshot of what's to come:

April 14:  SAME Philadelphia Post Small Business Conference 2021

This year's SAME Philadelphia Post Small Business Conference 2021, which will be held virtually, includes presentations, interactive breakout sessions, an open forum networking session, and live capabilities introductions from each participating SAME member. The mission of SAME is to build leaders and lead collaboration among government and industry to develop multidisciplinary solutions to national security infrastructure challenges. Princeton Hydro joined SAME as a sustaining member in 2018.

Get more info & Register

April 19-24: Pitch in for Parks Volunteer Event

Westchester Parks Foundation and the Westchester County Parks Department will host its largest volunteer event of the year: “Pitch in for Parks.” Adhering to all COVID guidelines, volunteers will come together to celebrate Earth Day and pitch in to help paint, rake, prepare and plant native flower beds, clear trails and shorelines, clean rivers, restore wildlife habitats, and remove invasive vines in parks throughout Westchester County. Princeton Hydro's Marketing Coordinator Kelsey Mattison participated in the event and exhibited with a variety of other event sponsors at Kensico Dam Plaza in Valhalla, NY on April 24th.

Get more info & Register

April 19-23: North American Lake Management Society's National Monitoring Conference

North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) is hosting its 12th Annual National Water Quality Monitoring Conference. This year's conference, which will be held virtually, invites all water stakeholders to participate, including federal, state, tribal, and local water professionals, non-profits, academia, volunteer citizen scientists, and industry experts. Princeton Hydro  is a proud sponsor of the event, and three of our team members are giving presentations:

  • Director of Aquatic Resources Dr. Fred Lubnow is presenting on "The Biology, Monitoring & Management of HABs in Lake Hopatcong, New Jersey" and acting as moderator for the "Integrative Lake and Watershed Management" real-time session.
  • Senior Aquatic Ecologist Dr. Jack Szczepanski is presenting on "Dealing With HABs at Greenwood Lake, Recent Seasons & the Future" as well as moderating a "Harmful Algal Blooms" real-time session.
  • Senior Aquatic Ecologist and NALMS President Elect Chris L. Mikolajczyk, CLM is presenting on "A Watershed-Based Assessment of the Lakes of the Borough of Ringwood & Township of West Milford, Passaic County, New Jersey" and moderating a "Harmful Algal Blooms" real-time session.
View the full program & Register here

April 29 - 30: The New York State Federation of Lake Associations Annual Conference

This year’s conference, which is titled, “Freshwater Ecosystems: Learning to Coexist,” will be held virtually via Zoom. Participants will enjoy a variety of interactive educational sessions, panel discussions and a NY lake trivia contest. Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor of the event, and our Aquatics Director Dr. Fred Lubnow is giving a presentation on "Management Activities to Prevent, Mitigate and/or Control HABs at Lake Hopatcong, NJ."

View the full program & Register here

May 4: North Atlantic Industry Day 

During SAME's 2021 virtual North Atlantic Industry Day, participants will hear from government and industry professionals on procurement opportunities and current A/E/C trends in the North Atlantic Region. Experts from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Coast Guard and FEMA will present on a variety of topics including: COVID-19 related safety measures, sustainability in small business, government contracting evaluation and the latest trends and tips for landing government contracts.

View the full program & Register here

May 5 - December 1: Webinar Series from FEMA Region 2

The webinar series from the FEMA Region 2 Mitigation and National Preparedness Division explores how to expand the reach of mitigation activities by engaging more people and organizations from across the whole community beyond those typically involved in hazard mitigation. One webinar will be hosted each month on a variety of topics centered around "Guides to Expanding Mitigation." The next webinar, being held on May 5, will focus on how to partner with community artists to communicate hazard risks and build a culture of preparedness.

Register here

May 24 - 27: 11th Annual Choose Clean Water Conference

Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor of Choose Clean Water Coalition's first-ever virtual Choose Clean Water Conference. The conference theme of A Changing Chesapeake will explore the ecological changes in the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed  as well as the ways organizations are changing due to COVID-19. Along with a virtual exhibit hall, the conference includes a variety of breakout sessions covering topics like, "Empowering Diverse Communities to Take Action in Stormwater Management," "People-Powered Restoration for Clean Water," and "Driving Digital Change in 2021."

View the full program & Register here

Upcoming Summer Events:

June 9-10: Rutger's Professional Education Course on Dam Removal

Register now for the Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education two-day virtual course: "Dam Removal: Design, Planning, and Implementation." Participants will learn about the technical aspects of dam removal, including the investigations and design of projects that both deregulate dams and provide river restoration and ecological uplift. This introductory, technical course includes presentations from Princeton Hydro team members: President Geoff Goll, P.E.; Director of Natural Resources Dr. Laura Craig; Director of Stormwater Management & Green Infrastructure Dr. Clay Emerson, P.E, CFM; Fluvial Geomorphologist Paul Woodworth, CERP; along with Dr. Steve Souza of Clean Waters Consulting, LLC and Beth Styler-Barry, Director of River Restoration, The Nature Conservancy.

Learn more & Register here.

June 21-24: The Society for Ecological Restoration's World Conference

"A New Global Trajectory: Catalyzing Change Through the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration" is the title of the Society for Ecological Restoration's 9th World Conference on Ecological Restoration. Held virtually this year, the conference will bring together from around the world scientists, academics, researchers and experts from the fields of rehabilitation and environmental restoration, alongside practitioners and industry leaders to tackle the vast environmental challenges that we face today. The conference also includes virtual field trips; workshops, keynote, and plenary sessions; live discussion sessions and poster presentations; and networking events. Princeton Hydro President Geoffrey Goll, P.E. is presenting on "Removing Dams of the American Industrial Revolution in the Northeastern U.S. to Restore Natural Capital Against Climate Change."

Learn more & Register here.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT:

Celebrating the Delaware River: A Webinar Series from American Rivers and the Stroud Water Research Center

American Rivers and Stroud Water Research Center held a four-part webinar series celebrating the Delaware River, which was named "River of the Year 2020" by American Rivers for its progress in improving water quality, river restoration, and community revitalization. The fourth webinar, titled "Federal Protections for the Free-Flowing Delaware River," featured presentations from a variety of experts including Alan Hunt, Director of Policy and Grants at the Musconetcong Watershed Association.  If you missed any of the webinars, have no fear! They were all recorded in full and are available for viewing anytime.

Watch the webinars here.

Engineering With Nature: An Atlas, Volume 2 Virtual Book Launch Ceremony

Engineering With Nature (EWN) is an initiative of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that enables more sustainable delivery of economic, social, and environmental benefits associated with water resources infrastructure. An Atlas, Volume 2, which is set to publish in early April, showcases 62 project examples from the US and around the world demonstrating what it means to partner with nature to deliver engineering solutions. The virtual book launch ceremony was held on April 7, 2021 and included messages from LTG Scott A. Spellmon, 55th Chief of Engineers and Commanding General, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and other executives and leaders from organizations around the world.

Get more info here.

STAY TUNED FOR MORE EVENT SPOTLIGHTS!

   
 
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In addition to providing drinking water to nearly 2 million people, the Schuylkill River is the largest tributary of the Delaware River and supports crucial ecological and social functions for the millions of residents who live near its banks.

The Industrial Revolution and coal operations had severe and lasting negative impacts on the river’s water quality and ecological health. Over the years, thanks to the hard work of many scientists, conservationists, and concerned citizens, the Schuylkill River is making a comeback; and you can help!

Princeton Hydro is working with project partners Schuylkill River Greenways, Berks Nature, Bartram’s Garden, The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, and Stroud Water Research Center to conduct a water quality project on the Schuylkill River. The project, which focuses on the main stem of the river - from Berks Nature in Reading to Bartram’s Gardens in southwest Philadelphia - has four main components:

  1. Gather opinion and perceptions via a community survey.
  2. Perform water quality monitoring to understand the ecological status.
  3. Launch a Community Scientist program for perform litter assessments.
  4. Develop a community engagement plan with educational outreach.

Becoming a Community Scientist for the Schuylkill River is an easy way for everyone to get involved and is a crucial component to protecting and restoring this precious resource. The Community Scientist Visual Assessment takes only five minutes and can be conducted from a mobile device:

  1. Find a spot along the Schuylkill River.
  2. Open the survey using your phone's browser: bit.ly/litterform
  3. Select your location on the map.
  4. Upload a photo.
  5. Rate the 100 foot section of the river.

We created a video, featuring Aquatic Ecologist Michael Hartshorne, that provides a brief walkthrough of how to assess litter and fill out the monitoring form.

WATCH NOW:

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfJByAzthT4&t=3s[/embed] Take a hike, walk, or bike ride, grab your phone, and join the endeavor to preserve the Schuylkill River! And, check out Schuylkill River Greenways to learn about more ways to get involved.

[post_title] => WATCH: How to Become a Schuylkill River Community Scientist [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => community-science [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-04-20 02:41:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-04-20 02:41:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.princetonhydro.com/blog/?p=6047 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5455 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2020-10-13 16:44:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-10-13 16:44:21 [post_content] => By Brittany Smith, Environmental Scientist at Princeton Hydro 

As a graduate student in the geology program at the University of Texas at Austin, I worked on a study that used remote sensing to explore links between coastal geomorphology and ecology at the Wax Lake Delta in Louisiana. In this blog, I provide a snapshot of my research, which was recently published in the journal Remote Sensing.

What is the Wax Lake Delta?

The Wax Lake Delta is a small, young river delta in Louisiana that began growing in the 1940s after the construction of the Wax Lake Outlet. In 1941 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dug the Wax Lake Outlet from the Atchafalaya River - it extended out to the coastline and was designed to reduce the severity of floods in nearby Morgan City.

Image by NASA/Jesse Allen: While the Mississippi River Delta has been washing into the Gulf of Mexico and receding just to the west the Wax Lake and Atchafalaya River deltas (pictured above) are growing. Satellite imagery shows how the deltas have grown between 1984 (left) and 2014 (right).

This outlet provided a constant flow of water to be diverted from the river before reaching the banks of Morgan City, which had experienced several devastating floods. Approximately 40 percent of the Atchafalaya’s discharge gets channeled through the Wax Lake Outlet, which has the capacity to carry a maximum of 440,000 cubic feet per second.

Following the creation of the Wax Lake Outlet, the turbulent flow of water began to carry sediment down the outlet, which deposited at the mouth of the outlet and, over time, caused an underwater delta to grow. In just over 40 years, the Wax Lake Delta grew from nothing to an area twice the size of Manhattan. Research shows that it receives 34 million tons of sediment per year. Today, it spans roughly 7 miles out into the Gulf of Mexico and provides valuable habitat for a variety of animals.

The Why Behind the Research

Many coastal areas have been retreating or drowning as a result of subsidence and decreased sediment availability due to upstream dams and levees. According to the Population Reference Bureau, “Today, approximately 3 billion people — about half of the world's population — live within 200 kilometers of a coastline. By 2025, that figure is likely to double.”

This population is increasingly vulnerable to flooding and erosion due to sea level rise and storms, especially in coastal Louisiana, where land loss is prevalent due to subsidence and decreased sediment supply.

The Wax Lake Delta is one of the few places in coastal Louisiana that is building rather than losing land, so is seen as an example of processes that could be applied elsewhere on the Gulf Coast to mitigate subsidence and restore coastal wetlands. Additionally, it is an ideal study site because it is relatively small, young enough that it has a good historic record, and has been largely unaltered by human activities.

This image depicts the study area: (a) The Wax Lake Delta (WLD, red square) is located at the terminus of the Wax Lake Outlet (blue line), which diverts water from the Atchafalaya River (purple line) in the U.S. state of Louisiana. The Atchafalaya is a distributary channel for the Mississippi (green line) and Red (red line) Rivers. (b) Image of WLD from 28-Sep-2010 by Landsat [88], for water level y = 0.35 m (NAVD88) at Camp Island gage (yellow dot) [93]. (c) Image of WLD from 24-Apr-2011 by Landsat [88], for water level y = 0.67 m (NAVD88) at Camp Island gage. WLD Pintail Island test case area outlined in white.  
The Research in a Nutshell

Elevation is a very important variable in coastal ecosystems, as it controls how frequently a site is flooded. This in turn controls how frequently sediment can be delivered or removed from the site, and also what type of vegetation will grow there.

To understand how the Wax Lake Delta is growing, it would be ideal to have an understanding of how the topography has changed over time. Unfortunately, very little elevation data was available for the Wax Lake Delta, so I had to develop an indirect way of getting this information.

Photo Credit: Field and StreamWhat I did have available was a significant amount of Landsat satellite imagery. This was useful to me for two reasons: the delta is extremely flat and low-lying (less than 3 feet above sea level), and the tidal cycle typically fluctuates between 0-3 feet above mean sea level. This means that since each satellite image is taken at a different water level, different parts of the delta are exposed above the water in each picture. Taken together as a group over time, we can start to get a sense of which areas are higher and more likely to be exposed, and which areas are more likely to be flooded, and therefore at a lower elevation.

To do this in a quantitative way, I took all the images taken over a three year period and converted them to binary images, where land was classified as 1, and water classified as 0. I then added the images together, to create a composite image where pixels with higher values corresponded to areas that were exposed more frequently, and pixels with lower values were more frequently flooded.

Using water level data from a USGS gauge station that was installed at the delta in late 2008, I was able to develop a probability distribution of water levels. Taking these together - a probability map of flooding frequency and a probability distribution of water level elevations - I was able to create topographic maps based on the Landsat satellite imagery.

By performing this method over a number of years, patterns emerge about how the delta is evolving over time. The island changes from a relatively amorphous, unorganized shape to a defined outer levee and inner island platform.

Photo Credit: The National Wildlife FederationA deeper knowledge of the delta topography, allows us to look at connections to the delta ecology. We know that elevation controls hydrology and therefore plant growth, but we have also seen situations where plants can in-turn affect elevation by contributing organic matter to the soil, preventing erosion due to the root mat, or trapping sediment with their stems when sediment-laden water flows through.

In the case of salt marshes, previous studies have shown that if there is a feedback between the two, it occurs because a) plants tend to be most productive at a specific elevation and b) plants are in some way contributing to sediment accumulation relative to their productivity.

Photo Credit: USGSFor example, if a plant grows best at an elevation of two feet, it grows really densely at two feet, contributes more organic matter to the soil, bigger roots grow that help increase cohesion and reduce erosion, and the stems are denser and trap more sediment when the area is flooded. These all help increase the elevation of the marsh over time. However, if the elevation starts to get too high, the plant grows less densely, contributes less to the marsh surface, and the elevation will drop back down until the plant is happy again. Over time, the surface of the marsh will start to organize around these ideal elevations, creating a terraced effect with platforms corresponding to different plant types that do particularly well at that elevation.

When we look at how a transect down the center of the delta island has changed over time, we see that it goes from a relatively smooth, straight line, to a stepped system comparable to the models from other studies. When we compare the elevations of these platforms to the vegetation communities at the delta, we find that they correspond positively to high-marsh and low-marsh plants. This suggests that there is feedback occurring between plants and sediment accumulation at the delta.

In Conclusion

This research a) developed a new approach for investigating changes in coastal topography using satellite imagery, and b) confirmed that there is likely to be feedbacks between sediment deposition, marsh elevation, and vegetation growth. These feedbacks should be considered in any coastal wetland restoration and land building efforts.

Brittany Smith is an Environmental Scientist with an extensive background in hydrology and ecology. At Princeton Hydro, she has been involved in a wide variety of projects including stream assessments, wetland water budget modeling, soil field assessments, GIS analysis, permitting, and aquatic ecology. She holds a Master of Science in Geology with an emphasis in hydrology and geomorphology from the University of Texas at Austin, and a Bachelor of Science in Plant Biology from the University of California at Davis. Brittany has strong skills in data analysis and management, as well as experience in a broad range of field and laboratory techniques.

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The nonprofit Schuylkill River Greenways, in partnership with Berks Nature, Bartram’s Garden, The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, Stroud Water Research Center, and Princeton Hydro, is kicking off a Water Quality Monitoring Project for the Schuylkill River on World Habitat Day, Monday, October 5, 2020. This project, focused on the main stem of the river from Berks Nature in Reading to Bartram’s Garden in southwest Philadelphia, is aimed to document the current ecological status and health of the river and seeks to engage and educate a diverse set of river users and residents.

"An important aspect of our mission is to connect communities to the Schuylkill River through recreational and educational activities," said Tim Fenchel, Deputy Director of Schuylkill River Greenways. "To fully achieve the river’s potential, we must help the public understand the current health status and what they can do to continue to improve its quality for this generation and generations to come."

In order to monitor the presence and/or distribution of litter along the Schuylkill River, the team is launching a campaign to recruit “Community Scientists” to conduct 5-minute Visual Monitoring Assessments. Using their mobile device, these volunteers can simply record the trash accumulation or dumping points along a 100-foot section of the Schuylkill River via a user-friendly form accessed via a cell phone: bit.ly/litterform.

“Trash is important to address when talking about the health of a waterway because it’s often the most visually obvious form of pollution. Bacterial and chemical pollution are generally less directly observable, but when we see trash, it instantly informs our impression of a body of water,” said Chloe Wang, River Programs Coordinator at Bartram's Garden. “And, it can point to larger problems. For example, near Bartram’s Garden, a lot of trash washes into the river from combined sewer overflows, which also introduce harmful bacteria into the water. It will be interesting to see how the presence of trash differs along various stretches of the Schuylkill.”

The Community Scientist visual assessments require no formal training and are meant to be a simple effort that any resident can complete. We’ve developed an assessment survey, which can be accessed and submitted via a smartphone or tablet by opening the link in the phone/tablet’s browser.

“This is an opportunity for anyone with an interest in the Schuylkill River to spend time on the river and provide valuable feedback on the conditions of the river,” said David Bressler, Project Facilitator at Stroud Water Research Center. “Schuylkill River Greenways and its partners in this project are looking for motivated and dependable individuals to help them learn about the Schuylkill River and move in positive directions toward making the river more accessible to the community. Support from volunteers is very important and is greatly appreciated."

The goal is to document critical areas of trash accumulation or dumping points in order to guide management efforts to better deal with this pollution. In addition to the multiple-choice questions to rank trash levels and quantities, this platform asks volunteers to submit a photo of the area and collects the GPS location. By utilizing this user-friendly platform, the data collected under this effort will be summarized and visualized by the project team.

“This project is an important study that we can use to connect people back to the river and show that the Schuylkill River is a place to be enjoyed by the entire community surrounding it and beyond,” said Michael Griffith, Education & Watershed Specialist at Berks Nature.

In 1985 the United Nations designated the first Monday of October every year as World Habitat Day. The idea is to reflect on the state of our towns and cities and the basic right of all to adequate shelter and to remind the world of its collective responsibility for the future of the human habitat. By understanding and improving water quality in the Schuylkill River, we are creating a place that enables community members to access public green and open spaces. This effort also supports UN Sustainable Development Goal 11, which aims for resilient, inclusive, safe, diverse cities by 2030.

In addition to the Community Scientist visual assessments, the stakeholder team is conducting water quality sampling and monitoring over the next year at four locations along the main stem of the Schuylkill River. This scientific documentation of critical water quality parameters will be performed by the stakeholder group’s employees and long term volunteers, who are trained in data collection and scientific methods. We will collect data on bacterial concentrations in the river using a combination of 3-M Petrifilm kits and laboratory-based analytical measures. In addition, in-situ temperature, oxygen, pH, and turbidity data will be collected utilizing Mayfly dataloggers.

"Our research shows that residents care about the river, but are not confident whether it is clean or safe to use for recreational activity. So we’ve designed a volunteer survey and scientific water quality assessment to document the ecological health of the Schuylkill River," said Michael Hartshorne, Aquatic Resources Project Manager at Princeton Hydro. "By studying bacterial inputs and identifying hotspots for trash, we can communicate the status of the river, provide recommendations on areas of improvement, and ultimately, change the current public perception of the river."

For the water quality monitoring, Princeton Hydro scientists will provide training to the partner nonprofit organizations’ staff and review the methods and protocols to assure the highest level of quality. This long-term data collection effort is slated to begin this month and continue for approximately one year. The results of this assessment will allow us to determine potential hotspots related to nutrient and bacteria inputs and to understand the overall ecological health of the Schuylkill River.

Overall, through this effort, the stakeholder team hopes to connect residents and communities with the Schuylkill River and to encourage engagement with this special resource.

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In honor of Earth Day, Princeton Hydro held its annual Photo Contest with the theme "Human Impact" for its employees. We’d like to thank everyone who submitted photos this year. Overall, we received 27 gorgeous submissions from our staff.

All photos were rated on the following criteria by three volunteer judges: Danielle Odom, Lucy Aquilino, and Amanda Brooks (see bios below).
  • Technical Quality (30%)
  • Originality (30%)
  • Artistic Merit (40%)
THE WINNER OF THE PRINCETON HYDRO 2020 EARTH DAY PHOTO CONTEST IS...
[caption id="attachment_4866" align="aligncenter" width="1230"] Southern New Jersey - Although its a local and small impact, I intentionally leave dead wood in sunny places on my property. This ensures that I always have an Eastern Fence Lizard like this big female to greet me when I come home. by Clay Emerson, PE, CFM, PhD.[/caption] Scroll to the bottom to see a gallery of runner-up photos.
ABOUT THE JUDGES:
DANIELLE ODOM

Danielle is a Staff Scientist II at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University. Her career is dedicated to watershed monitoring research and her responsibilities include both field and laboratory work. She has specialized in studying biological indicators as a parameter to track stream health via macroinvertebrate taxonomy; in particular identifying members of the non-biting midge family Chironomidae. Once an experiential outdoor educator, she taught nature photography to middle school students as a pathway to understanding different perspectives and the impact of humans on the environment, a la Ansel Adams.

Lucy Aquilino

Lucy is a retired Parole officer and amateur photographer. A mom of 2, she loves taking nature photos and going on adventures with her kids.

Amanda Brooks

Amanda is a nature enthusiast who loves taking long walks in the woods with her camera and notepad. With her degree in Environmental Studies and English and her background in the arts, she is always looking for creative ways to capture the beauty of nature to inspire its protection. She currently resides in Burlington, Vermont and works as a tree-monger at Gardener's Supply Company. You can check out more of her work on her Facebook page. 

[gallery ids="4872,4871,4869,4877,4875,4873"] Check out the photos from last year's Earth Day photo contest here: [embed]https://www.princetonhydro.com/blog/2019-earth-day-photo-contest/[/embed] [post_title] => Our 2020 Earth Day Photo Contest Winner! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => our-2020-earth-day-photo-contest-winner [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-04-22 19:02:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-04-22 19:02:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.princetonhydro.com/blog/?p=4864 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5862 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2020-04-22 05:32:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-22 05:32:04 [post_content] =>

We're excited to put the spotlight on Princeton Hydro Environmental Scientist Emily Bjorhus and her admirable volunteer work.

As an Environmental Scientist, Emily Bjorhus works on a wide range of projects from flood risk management to wetland mitigation to stream restoration. She specializes in wetland and stream ecology and environmental permitting and compliance. Outside of the office, Emily is an active volunteer with Natural Lands and the Delaware Shorebird Project, working to protect natural resources, promote biodiversity, and protect important species. Emily also volunteers at Franklin Delano Roosevelt High School in Brooklyn, NY teaching Environmental Science students about wetlands. We've put together a snapshot of Emily’s volunteer activities:

Natural Lands – Force of Nature Volunteer

Natural Lands is a nonprofit organization that saves open space, cares for nature, and connects people to the outdoors in eastern Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey. Founded in the early 1950s, today nearly five million people live within five miles of lands under Natural Lands’ permanent protection.

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As a Force of Nature volunteer with Natural Lands, Emily has been monitoring ~20 nest boxes located in meadow and forest edge habitat at Gwynedd Preserve since 2018. From April through mid-August, Emily and another volunteer visit the sites every 5-7 days to monitor the nest boxes for the types of species using the boxes, nest condition, nest materials, number of eggs laid, number of eggs that hatch, and number of chicks that fledge. Chickadees, wrens, blue birds, and tree swallows are the primary species that nest in the boxes Emily monitors.

When asked what she loves most about this volunteer work, Emily said, “I love watching how the birds build their nest week after week, seeing the eggs multiply and tracking the chicks' growth. I even enjoy dodging dive-bombing tree swallows.”

Delaware Shorebird Project – Data Collection Volunteer

Delaware Shorebird Project is led by DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife in partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Delaware Museum of Natural History, British Trust for Ornithology and Wash Wader Ringing Group, with the help of experienced and dedicated volunteers like Emily.

The project monitors the health and status of migratory shorebird populations to collect data that can be applied to the conservation of these birds. The research has resulted in better understanding of the ecology of shorebirds migrating through Delaware Bay, management of the horseshoe crab harvest to sustain the shorebirds’ population, and protection of key shorebird habitat.

Emily participated in a 3-day shorebird monitoring initiative, which included counting the number of shorebirds on the beach, re-sighting birds previously marked with leg flags, participating in bird catches, and weighing and measuring birds from the catches. The data collected helps monitor trends in shorebird abundance, migratory routes, condition and other important biological data.

“It's such a pleasure working with the amazing people that come from all over the world to run and participate in this ambitious study,” said Emily. “The data collected from this program will hopefully aid researchers and policy makers to develop strategies to better protect shorebird habitat in the future.”

Franklin Delano Roosevelt High School Environmental Studies – Guest Speaker

Ms. Hannah Goldstein and her Environmental Science students at Franklin Delano Roosevelt High School in Brooklyn, NY welcome Emily as a volunteer guest speaker to teach all about wetlands. The instruction also includes a hands-on session where students collect soil samples to determine if hydric soils are present and identify surrounding trees using a dichotomous key.

“Science is such an important subject matter for kids to be learning for a variety of reasons. Environmental science education in particular encourages thought patterns, which get kids engaged in real-world environmental protection activities,” said Emily. “I really enjoy working with Ms. Goldstein and her students. I hope my presentation inspires the students to learn more about wetlands and become ambassadors of wetland conservation.”

 

Emily earned her M.S. in Sustainable Engineering at Villanova University and holds a B.S. in Environmental Science from University of Colorado at Boulder. As an Environmental Scientist for Princeton Hydro, she coordinates, leads and assists with state environmental permitting programs and NEPA compliance and documentation, including preparation of Federal and state permit applications, Endangered Species Act 7 consultations, and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) environmental review processes. In addition, she conducts a variety of environmental field investigations such as wetland and waterbody delineations.

We’re so proud to have Emily on our team and truly value the work she does inside and outside the office.

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The Princeton Hydro team is proud to be participating in and sponsoring a variety events focused on conserving, restoring, and protecting our precious water resources. In this edition of our Events Spotlight, we provide a snapshot of upcoming events this Fall and information on how to get involved:

 

October 5: "Facebook Live" Q&A with Princeton Hydro HAB Experts

Do you have questions about harmful algal blooms? Now is your chance to get answers! Join us on Tuesday, October 5 at 6:30 PM EDT for a "Facebook Live" conversation with two of Princeton Hydro's HAB experts, Dr. Fred Lubnow and Mike Hartshorne. Participants will get an overview of HABs and engage in a live Q&A session. You can submit a question by joining the live feed and typing in the comments. Get more info and register.

October 11-15: SAME MEGA Maryland - Small/Minority Business Conference for A/E/C

This year’s conference features a mix of in-person and virtual events,  including informative keynotes; local, State, and Federal agency panels; networking sessions; training workshops; webinars; and two special field trip activities. Princeton Hydro is honored to sponsor MEGA Maryland, which is seen as the premier event for the architecture, engineering, and construction industry. Our Director of Marketing, Dana Patterson, will be exhibiting at the in-person portion of the event. Get more info and register.

October 13: NJ Invasive Species Strike Team Professional Conference

Presented by the Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space and hosted by Duke Farms, the 2021 Annual New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team Conference will focus on the use of prescribed burning to combat invasive species. Princeton Hydro is sponsoring this event, which is being held outdoors under a tent. We look forward to seeing you there in October! Get more info and register

October 14: Linden Blue Acres Tour - Green Infrastructure & Floodplain Restoration

Join NJ-AWRA and Princeton Hydro for a tour of the Award-Winning Linden Blue Acres Green Infrastructure & Floodplain Restoration Project. This project set the precedent for enhancing ecological and floodplain function on flood-prone properties acquired by the NJDEP Blue Acres Program. This event is approved for one (1) credit hour of continuing education for Certified Floodplain Managers. Get more info and register

 

October 18: Fall 2021 Regional Lake Communities Symposium 

Western Connecticut State University presents its Fall 2021 Regional Lake Communities Symposium “Fall Science at Night Virtual Seminar Series." The seminar, titled “Threats to Our Lakes: Beyond Aquatic Invasive Plants,” welcomes members of the public, students, and scientists to participate in a variety of workshops focused on local lake conservation and management. Princeton Hydro’s Director of Aquatic Programs Dr. Fred Lubnow is presenting “The Lake Hopatcong (NJ) Story.” Get more info and register

October 19-20: 2021 Living Shorelines Tech Transfer Workshop

Join Restore America's Estuaries, American Littoral Society, NJDEP and the Chesapeake Bay and New Jersey field offices of the USFWS for the Living Shorelines & Nature - Based Methods Tech Transfer Workshop. The workshop, which is being held both virtually and in-person at the Grand Hotel in Cape May, NJ, features field trips to local restoration projects, workshops, networking events, and an exhibit hall. Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor of the event and our Director of Marketing & Communications Dana Patterson is exhibiting! Please note: Attendees must provide confirmation of COVID-19 vaccination as part of registration. Get more info and register

October 19-22: ANJEC 2021 Environmental Congress

We are thrilled to sponsor the 48th Annual Environmental Congress, which is being held in an all-virtual Zoom format. Each day includes a variety of workshop sessions on topics like stormwater management, environmental justice advancement in New Jersey, and local climate action. The closing session on Friday includes entertainment by Musician Maxwell Kofi Donkor. Get more info and register

October 26: Colorado Lake & Reservoir Management Association Conference

Princeton Hydro’s Senior Project Manager and Senior Aquatic Ecologist Chris L. Mikolajczyk, CLM, is giving a Halloween-inspired presentation titled "In Celebration of All Hallows Eve: Reflections of a Study on One of the Spookiest Lakes in the U.S." This free, one-day conference will be held virtually and is open to he public. Get more info and register

October 26-28: NJ Association for Floodplain Management 16th Annual Conference

The 16th Annual Conference will be held at the Hard Rock Casino Hotel in Atlantic City. With more than 40 speakers lined-up, conference workshops will focus on a robust array of floodplain management topics, including flood hazard identification and mapping; flood hazard mitigation; technical assistance and training; and natural resource protection and enhancement. Princeton Hydro is happy to sponsor this event and our Director of Marketing, Dana Patterson, will be attending and exhibiting. Get more info and register

 

November 1-4 and 8-11: Coastal & Estuarine Research Federation Biennial Conference

The theme of the 26th Biennial CERF Conference is "CERF at 50: Celebrating Our Past, Charting Our Future." The virtual, eight-day conference aims to connect science and society in the collective goals of preserving coastal and estuarine habitats, resources, and heritage. The conference, which is expected to draw 1,300+ scientists and researchers from all over the world, includes a virtual exhibit hall, networking events, a film festival and a variety of workshops. Johnny Quispe, Princeton Hydro Natural Resources Project Manager, is presenting on November 3 at 10 AM as part of the session on "Transdisciplinary design and adaptation for sustainable, resilient urban coastlines: realizing triple-bottom line outcomes." His presentation features The South River Ecosystem Restoration & Flood Resiliency Enhancement Project. Get more info and register.

November 3-5: Fifth Annual Watershed Conference

The Watershed Institute’s 5th Annual Watershed Conference will be in a hybrid format with participants selecting socially distanced, in-person sessions at the Watershed Center and Reserve or choosing to attend virtually if they prefer. Princeton Hydro is sponsoring the event and leading two workshops. Our Director of Green Infrastructure and Stormwater Management, Dr. Clay Emerson, P.E., CFM, along with Kathy Hale, Principal Watershed Protection Specialist, NJ Water Supply Authority, is presenting on “Naturalizing Detention Basins.” And, Vice President Mark Gallagher, along with Patrick Ryan of the NJDEP, is presenting on "Understanding Permit Requirements for Conservation Activities." Get more info and register.

November 6-10: American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting 2021

Science professionals from throughout the world will come together for this hybrid-format event offering both virtual and in-person participation opportunities. This year's conference, themed “Investing in People, Habitat, and Science” includes scientific sessions, a poster hall, a tradeshow and exhibits, and a variety of Plenary Speakers. Princeton Hydro President Geoffrey Goll is presenting on, "Dam Removal in History, Current State of Removal, and Future Needs." Get more info and register

 

November 9-10: Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference

The Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference is coordinated by the New Jersey Highlands Coalition, with the support of partner organizations in the Highlands and Ridge & Valley regions of New Jersey. Together, these groups are collaborating to restore water quality under the four-state Delaware River Watershed Initiative. The 2021 Conference, held in an online-only format, will focus on three key themes, "Sustainability & Economic Development," "Land Use Planning & Conservation," and "Water Quality Monitoring & Management." The conference is free and open to the public, and includes a variety of presentations, workshops and a virtual exhibitor hall. Princeton Hydro is exhibiting.  Get more info and register

November 15-18: North American Lake Management Society 41st International Symposium

Princeton Hydro is sponsoring the NALMS 2021 International Symposium, which will be held virtually. The event consists of multiple panels and discussions focused on the value of water for economics, ecology, and culture. Senior Project Manager Christopher L. Mikolajczyk, CLM is giving a presentation titled "A Public-Private Approach to Lake and Watershed Management in the Highlands Region of New Jersey.” Our Director of Aquatic Resources, Dr. Fred Lubnow, is presenting on "Monitoring and Management of HABs in New Jersey Waterbodies From 2019 to 2021." Get more info and register

November 21: Camden Environmental Summit

This one-day virtual summit, hosted by the The Camden Collaborative Initiative, focuses on preserving the environment in the city of Camden. Princeton Hydro is proud to sponsor this event, which is free for Camden residents and students, and $25 for all other attendees. Get more info and register.

 

Stay Tuned for More! 

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