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The North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) held its 42nd Annual International Symposium from November 14–17 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Water resource professionals, researchers, students and practitioners came together to share ideas and learn about managing and protecting lakes and their watersheds.

[gallery link="none" columns="4" ids="11980,11947,11948,11981"]

This year’s conference, which was titled, “Leveraging Experience to Manage Diverse Lakes, Landscapes, and People,” featured an exhibitor hall, networking events, and a variety of presentations and workshops. Princeton Hydro, a proud contributing sponsor of the conference, led four presentations and one workshop; below, we provide a free download of each.


Princeton Hydro’s Senior Aquatic Ecologist and NALMS Board of Directors President Chris L. Mikolajczyk, CLM gave the following two presentations:

Click here to learn more and download the presentations.

Dr. Fred Lubnow, Senior Technical Director, Ecological Services for Princeton Hydro presented on “The Development of Site-Specific Harmful Algal Bloom (HABs) Management Plans.”

Click here to learn more and download the presentation.

Princeton Hydro Senior Aquatic Ecologist Paul Cooper led a presentation titled, “A 30-Year Assessment of Internal Phosphorus Loading, Nutrient Load Management, and Climate Change at Lake Hopatcong.”

Click here to learn more and download the presentation.

On the first day of the conference, Chris and Fred led a half-day workshop about developing Harmful Algal Blooms Management and Restoration Plans for Beaches and Marinas, which are designed as part of a larger, all-encompassing Watershed Implementation Plan. The workshop provided both in-lake, near-shore, and local watershed solutions to preserve water quality and protect the health of people and pets utilizing these waterbodies.

Click here to learn more and download the presentation.

A daring group of symposium participants bundled up and braved the cold temperatures for the Clean Lakes Classic 5k Run, which Princeton Hydro sponsored. The point-to-point course followed along the Mississippi River, through city greenways, and around snowy Minneapolis neighborhoods.

[gallery columns="4" ids="11943,11928,11927,11944"]

We’re also excited to announce that Chris L. Mikolajczyk won this year’s International Symposium photo contest for this stunning image he captured during a recent visit to Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado. The photo is titled “Aquatic Plant Management: No Permits Needed!”

Congratulations, Chris! . . . Founded in 1980, NALMS is dedicated to forging partnerships among citizens, scientists, and professionals to foster the management and protection of lakes and reservoirs for today and tomorrow. For more information about NALMS and upcoming events, click here. To read about upcoming events that Princeton Hydro is participating in and sponsoring, click here. [post_title] => FREE DOWNLOADS: Presentations from the North American Lake Management Society International Symposium [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => free-presentation-downloads-nalms-2022 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-12-07 22:04:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-12-07 22:04:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11974 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11552 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-10-31 13:03:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-10-31 13:03:10 [post_content] =>

Welcome to the latest edition of our Client Spotlight series, which provides an inside look at our collaboration and accomplishments with a specific client.

For this Client Spotlight, we spoke with Tim Fenchel, Deputy Director of Schuylkill River Greenways National Heritage Area (SRG). The mission of SRG is to connect residents, visitors, and communities to the Schuylkill River and the Schuylkill River Trail by serving as a catalyst for civic engagement and economic development in order to foster stewardship of the watershed and its heritage. The boundaries of the Heritage Area cover the Schuylkill River watershed in Schuylkill, Berks, Chester, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties.

Let's dive in!

1. Tell us a little about SRG and what makes it unique?

[embed]https://youtu.be/vhdJlEUKyOg[/embed]

2. What does SRG value?

We value our heritage and the deeply-rooted culture of this region. We also look ahead to how we can continue to engage our communities with that heritage and create future generations of stewards for the Schuylkill River and Schuylkill River Trail.

We value vibrant and revitalized communities, and it’s rewarding to see how SRG has contributed to sustainable revitalization of river-town communities, including Phoenixville, Manayunk, and Pottstown. We really value helping to maintain a strong connection between the river and its surrounding neighborhoods. By enabling and encouraging communities to enjoy the river and trail, we create lifelong stewards of these important resources.

Another core value is making outdoor recreation accessible for everyone. The trail is a public recreational resource that anyone can enjoy, and we really try to promote it as a means for health and wellness, all kinds of recreation experiences, family-friendly outings, arts and culture, and much more.

Collaboration is also very valuable to SRG. Every single project and program that we do, we do it in partnership with at least one other organization if not multiple other organizations. The Schuylkill River Water Quality project, which we’ll talk more about today, is a great example of that.


3. What is your primary role within SRG?

As Deputy Director, I get to be involved in just about everything that we do here. I assist with the day-to-day operations of the organization; I pitch in with trail issues when they arise; I’m involved, in some way shape or form, with our various community events throughout the year; and I also have several projects and programs that I personally oversee. The Schuylkill River Water Quality project is one, which we'll discuss in more detail shortly.

Another unique project I oversee is the Schuylkill River Restoration Fund. Essentially, SRG receives funding from both private and public entities, and we then regrant those funds to local government agencies, nonprofits, and community organizations to implement on-the-ground projects for the improvement of water quality throughout the Schuylkill River Watershed. The grants focus on three major sources of pollution: stormwater run-off, agricultural pollution, and abandoned mine drainage.

There is a lot of variety in my role here, which I really enjoy.


4. What excites you about going to work every day?

[embed]https://youtu.be/LAcyIU4HvYQ[/embed]

5. Can you talk a little bit about the partnership between SRG and Princeton Hydro, and the Schuylkill River Water Quality project?

An important aspect of our mission is to connect communities to the Schuylkill River through recreational and educational activities. To fully achieve the Schuylkill River’s potential, we must help the public understand the current health status and what they can do to continue to improve its quality for this generation and generations to come. In 2019, we received a grant from the William Penn Foundation to fund the Schuylkill River Water Quality project, which aimed to document the current ecological status and health of the river, and engage and educate a diverse set of river users and residents.

Through an RFP process, we selected Princeton Hydro as one of the main project advisors. From the start, we hit it off with Michael Hartshorne, Director of Aquatics, and Dana Patterson, Director of Marketing & Communications. The strength of what they brought as a team and their scientific water quality and engagement expertise impressed us from the start and it really carried on throughout the entirety of the project. We had a truly tremendous team of partners, including Berks Nature, Bartram’s Garden, The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, and Stroud Water Research Center.

The project, which focused on the main stem of the river from Reading to Southwest Philadelphia, included four key components:

  1. User Opinion and Perceptions Survey
  2. Community Science Visual Assessment Trash Survey
  3. Water Quality Monitoring
  4. Educational Outreach

The yearlong data collection and community science initiative culminated with the launch of  an interactive ArcGIS StoryMap webpage that reveals the local perceptions of the Schuylkill River and aims to connect residents with and encourage engagement with this special resource.

[embed]https://youtu.be/5QHMQwGvU38[/embed] Click here to explore the interactive ArcGIS StoryMap:

6. Do you have a favorite or most memorable moment from the project?

[embed]https://youtu.be/l6PzseNpdNI[/embed]

7. The Schuylkill River StoryMap is part of a larger project to foster positive perceptions of the Schuylkill River. Can you talk a little more about your goals moving forward and how you plan to use the StoryMap?

[embed]https://youtu.be/eCKyofuKCcE[/embed]

8. What are some of SRG’s initiatives and upcoming activities that you’d like to share?

We have so many wonderful events throughout the year that provide an opportunity for community members to learn about and engage with the Schuylkill River and the Trail.

We just held the Ride for the River outing, which is a one-day bike ride and fundraising event. The ride began at the Pottstown River Front Park and followed about 20-miles of the Schuylkill River Trail to Reading. It’s always a ton of fun.

Every June we have our Annual Schuylkill River Sojourn, which consists of a 7-day, 112-mile guided canoe/kayak trip on the Schuylkill River that begins in rural Schuylkill Haven and ends in Philadelphia. The event combines kayaking/canoeing, camping, education, and games into one exciting adventure.

In November, we're hosting our 18th annual “Scenes of the Schuylkill” Art Show. Throughout the year, we host several free educational programs, do guided tours at locations within the Heritage Area, and so much more.

Click here to learn more about SRG’s Programs and Events.

 

A big thanks to Tim and SRG for taking part in our Client Spotlight Series!

Schuylkill River Greenways relies on help from volunteers, who provide valued assistance with trail maintenance, special events, environmental education, water quality monitoring and more. To learn more about how to get involved, visit SRG's volunteer portal for a full rundown of opportunities.

  Click below to read the previous edition of our Client Spotlight Series featuring Seatuck Environmental Association Conservation Policy Advocate Emily Hall: [visual-link-preview encoded="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"] [post_title] => Client Spotlight: Schuylkill River Greenways National Heritage Area [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => client-spotlight-schuylkill-river-greenways [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-10-31 17:16:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-10-31 17:16:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11552 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11717 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-10-26 17:09:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-10-26 17:09:16 [post_content] =>

Princeton Hydro led a stormwater management webinar during which participants learned about the purpose, management, and functionality of stormwater basins, and how to get involved in addressing stormwater management issues in their own communities. Dr. Clay Emerson, P.E., CFM and Mark Gallagher, the webinar instructors, provided examples of basins that could benefit most from a retrofit and step-by-step instructions on how to revitalize older basins to meet new stormwater standards and more effectively manage runoff.

  [embed]https://youtu.be/WRnSjGrHrog[/embed]  

The workshop, hosted by The Watershed Institute, is part of the Watershed Wednesdays webinar series, which explores a variety of topics related to protecting and improving water quality. The Watershed Institute, established in 1949, is a nonprofit organization located in Central New Jersey that promotes and advocates conservation and restoration of natural habitats, collects data on environmental conditions in its watersheds, and provides environmental education through numerous programs. To learn more about The Watershed Institute and other upcoming adult-education events, click here.

At Princeton Hydro, we are experts in stormwater management; we recognize the numerous benefits of green infrastructure; and we’ve been incorporating green infrastructure into our engineering designs since before the term was regularly used in the stormwater lexicon. Click here to read about the on-call stormwater services and ongoing residential, commercial, and professional redevelopment projects we’re working on in Tredeffryin Township, Pennsylvania.

[post_title] => WATCH: Understanding Stormwater Basins Near You [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => watch-understanding-stormwater-basins-near-you [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-10-26 17:45:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-10-26 17:45:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11717 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11651 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-10-03 06:45:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-10-03 06:45:04 [post_content] => [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekVqRMI5ncc[/embed]

For episode three of Stroud Water Research Center's 2022 Science Seminar Series, Michael Hartshorne, Director of Aquatics at Princeton Hydro (and former Stroud Center intern), gave a presentation about the ecological status of the Schuylkill River and shared the story of a yearlong community science project that included a volunteer survey and scientific water quality assessment. Stroud Center's Science Seminar lecture series, which provides an opportunity for the public to learn more about the issues that matter to them, has been running for over a decade. It also gives the public access to some of the world’s leading freshwater scientists and educators and the chance to learn how watershed science and education are tackling water-related challenges.

As described in Michael's presentation, the project, which included four phases, was implemented through a partnership between the Schuylkill River Greenways, Berks Nature, Bartram’s Garden, The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, Stroud Center, and Princeton Hydro.

First, to understand local perceptions of the river, investigators conducted a community survey of more than 300 residents from Berks, Chester, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties. Despite a majority of respondents reporting that they care about the river, many also reported concerns about trash and litter and whether the river is clean and safe enough for activities like swimming and fishing. This insight was used to drive the priorities for the in-depth water quality monitoring assessment and inspired the launch of a new Community Science trash monitoring program.

In June, the group launched an interactive ArcGIS StoryMap webpage that reveals the local perceptions of the Schuylkill River and aims to connect residents and communities with the Schuylkill River and encourage engagement with this special resource.

[post_title] => WATCH: Webinar on Understanding the Ecological Status of the Schuylkill River [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => watch-stroud-center-webinar [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-10-04 13:05:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-10-04 13:05:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11651 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11289 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-08-26 19:06:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-08-26 19:06:38 [post_content] =>

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) launched a Youth Inclusion Initiative to help the State of New Jersey develop the next generation of environmental protection, conservation and stewardship leaders while also providing an avenue for young adults from open space-constrained communities to engage with nature as they provide valuable stewardship services to the public through jobs at NJDEP. 

This year, the youth inclusion program is partnering with Groundwork Elizabeth, Rutgers University Camden, and Newark’s Ironbound Community Corporation to create a workforce development curriculum for people ages 17 to 24. Groundwork Elizabeth sent 12 participants to this year’s program, and Rutgers Camden and the Ironbound Community Corporation each sent 10.

[caption id="attachment_11299" align="aligncenter" width="771"] Photo by NJDEP[/caption]

The curriculum provides career education in the environmental protection field and helps the young participants develop the skills necessary to pursue those career paths in New Jersey. Participants learn through classroom instruction and by working across sectors regulated by the NJDEP, including water resources, air quality, energy and sustainability, public lands management, and wildlife. 

Susan Lockwood of NJDEP’s Division of Land Resource Protection’s Mitigation Unit reached out to Princeton Hydro to showcase ecosystem restoration and mitigation efforts across the state as well as discuss the variety of career roles that make these projects possible. Our portion of the curriculum entailed each group of students visiting two sites to learn about the benefits of restoring a landscape with native vegetation. Our discussion explored different fields of work related to urban environmental restoration and water resource protection and the job responsibilities of environmental scientists, water resource engineers, geologists, ecologists, pesticide applicators, and regulatory compliance specialists. 

The Abbott Marshlands in Trenton, New Jersey

[gallery link="none" ids="11287,11288,11281"]

After a quick stop at NJDEP’s office in Trenton to learn about NJ invasive species, all three groups popped over to the Tulpehaking Nature Center in Mercer County’s John A. Roebling Park to see the restoration site in the Abbott Marshlands. The 3,000-acre Abbott Marshlands is the northernmost freshwater tidal marsh on the Delaware River and contains valuable habitat for many rare species like River Otter, American Eel, Bald Eagle, and various species of wading birds. Unfortunately, the area has experienced a significant amount of loss and degradation, partially due to the introduction of the invasive Common Reed (Phragmites australis). For Mercer County Park Commission, Princeton Hydro implemented a restoration plan to remove Common Reed and expose the native seed bank in 40-acres of the marsh to increase biodiversity, improve recreational opportunities, and enhance visitor experience. Students learned how to tell the difference between the invasive Common Reed vs. native Wild Rice (Zizania palustris L.). They utilized tools of the trade like field guides and binoculars to identify flora and fauna in the marsh. Learn more about this project.


Mullica River Wetland Mitigation Site in Evesham, New Jersey

[gallery link="none" ids="11343,11342,11282"]

After visiting the Roebling site, students from Camden traveled down to Evesham Township in Burlington County to visit the Mullica River Wetland Mitigation Site. For this project, Princeton Hydro worked with GreenVest, LLC to restore a highly degraded 34-acre parcel of land which was previously used for cranberry cultivation. Through the implementation of restoration activities focused on removing the site’s agricultural infrastructure, Princeton Hydro and GreenVest were able to restore a natural wetland system on the site and over 1,600 linear feet of stream, providing forested, scrub-shrub, and emergent wetlands, forested uplands, headwater stream and riparian buffer, and critical wildlife habitat. The project also significantly uplifted threatened and endangered species habitats including Timber Rattlesnake.

Susan Lockwood of NJDEP, Owen McEnroe of GreenVest, and Dana Patterson of Princeton Hydro, lead the group of 10 students. They learned the difference between restoration and mitigation and got to experience the remoteness of Pinelands habitat. Walking through the site, we shared how the dam and dike removal helped to restore the river back to its natural free-flowing state and the numerous resulting environmental benefits.The site was chosen for the Camden students in order to demonstrate that successful mitigation and restoration projects happen throughout the State and not far from urban centers like Camden. Learn more about this project.


3. Third River Floodplain Wetland Enhancement Project in Bloomfield, New Jersey

[gallery link="none" ids="11344,11279,11277"]

After visiting the Roebling site, students from Newark and Elizabeth trekked up to Essex County to visit an urban wetland creation project now known as Lion Gate Park. The once densely developed, abandoned Scientific Glass Factory in Bloomfield Township was transformed into a thriving public park with 4.2 acres of wetlands. Students heard the story of how this project came to be; decades of advocacy and litigation by community members and environmental nonprofits to stop redevelopment of the site into 148 townhomes. Bloomfield Township eventually secured the property to preserve as open space through a range of grants from NJDEP. Serving as the ecological engineer to Bloomfield Township, Princeton Hydro designed, permitted, and oversaw construction for the restoration project and is currently monitoring the site. The restoration work brought back to the land valuable ecological functions and natural floodplain connection, enhanced aquatic and wildlife habitat, and increased flood storage capacity for urban stormwater runoff. Learn more about this project.


 

The NJDEP Youth Inclusion Initiative began on July 5 with a week of orientation classes, and continued through August with classroom and in-field learning. The initiative culminates on August 26 with a graduation and NJDEP Career Day, during which students will have the opportunity to meet with and discuss career options with various organizations tabling at the event, including Princeton Hydro.

Click here to learn more about the NJDEP education program. If you’re interested in learning more about Princeton Hydro’s ecological restoration services, click here.

[post_title] => Students from NJDEP's Youth Inclusion Initiative Tour Restored Landscapes with Princeton Hydro [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => njdep-youth-inclusion-initiative [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-08-26 19:13:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-08-26 19:13:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11289 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11177 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-08-16 16:31:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-08-16 16:31:47 [post_content] => Data visualization is an important tool for communicating science to a broader audience. Whether you are a volunteer community scientist or a professional aquatic ecologist, there are many free tools and low-cost programs that you can use to link the scientific data to actions that can improve water quality. Members of the Princeton Hydro team created a blog for a River Network that provides readers with 8 simple steps as well as tips and tricks on how to communicate your results most effectively. Click below to read the full blog:   For more tips and tricks, including a tutorial on how to make graphs using Microsoft Excel, graphic design 101, and a deeper dive on engagement strategies, watch the webinar Princeton Hydro led for River Network:   [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9kwW8I8GIY&t=2s[/embed] River Network, founded in 1988, has been at the forefront of expanding national interest in protecting the waters of the United States, encouraging diversity in the environmental movement, and helping engaged community members and local organizations take a stand for their waters. Read more. [post_title] => Data Visualization Tips and Tricks for Water Quality Monitoring [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => data-visualization-tips-and-tricks-for-water-quality-monitoring [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-08-16 16:36:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-08-16 16:36:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11177 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11118 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-07-13 13:03:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-07-13 13:03:18 [post_content] =>

A green roof is a roof fully or partially covered in plants and waterproof media that helps reduce the volume and velocity of stormwater runoff from roofs by temporarily storing stormwater, slowing excess stormwater release, and promoting evaporation.

Green roofs offer many benefits. They can help regulate a building’s internal temperature, which leads to heating and cooling energy savings; reduce stormwater runoff; mitigate the urban heat island effect; and increase biodiversity. 

From the planted rooftop of a building in Berwyn, Pennsylvania, we spoke with Philadelphia Green Roofs Principal and Owner Jeanne Weber, BSLA, GRP about the basics and benefits of green roofs for stormwater management. Click below to watch:

[embed]https://youtu.be/aD-c7rFTci8[/embed]

To learn more about green infrastructure and stormwater management, check out our blog:

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The Princeton Hydro team is proud to be participating in and sponsoring a variety of conferences, water quality workshops, and summertime community activities. In this Spotlight edition, we provide a snapshot of what's coming up and information on how to get involved:

July 15: Pennsylvania Lake Management Society's Full Moon Paddle

In celebration of Lakes Appreciation Month, you're invited to a full moon paddle/float on Blue Marsh Lake in Berks County, Pennsylvania. The event, which also includes a water quality education workshop and paddle board demonstration, is being hosted by PALMS, the staff of Blue Marsh Lake, Aqua Om Paddle, Penn State Extension Master Watershed Stewards, Berks County Conservation District, Tulpehocken Creek Watershed Association, and Berks Nature. The workshop and demo is from 5-8pm and the full moon paddle is from 8-10pm, both are free and open to people of all ages. Get more info.

July 21: Lake Hopatcong Foundation 10th Anniversary Gala & Auction

Lake Hopatcong Foundation (LHF) invites you to join its annual 10th Anniversary Gala & Auction, which aims to bring together community members who are passionate about Lake Hopatcong, to have fun and raise funds critically needed to protect the environment and enhance the experience on and around Lake Hopatcong. Guests are asked to wear hues of blue and are promised an evening of great camaraderie, food, music, an auction, and raffles.  Get more info & Register.

July 23: Trenton’s Summer Splash Bash

Are you looking for a fun way to celebrate summer with the whole family? Look no further than Trenton’s Summer Splash Bash hosted by the Trenton South Ward Neighborhood Association! This free, family-friendly event includes an all-hands-on-deck water blaster battle, live music, and much more! A proud sponsor of the bash, Princeton Hydro invites you to come by its exhibitor table to say hello. We hope to see you at Mill Hill Park on Saturday, July 23 from 1 - 5pm!


July 29: Riverfest - Musconetcong Watershed Association's 30th Anniversary Celebration

Join the Musconetcong Watershed Association (MWA) for its 30th Anniversary Celebration from 5 - 9pm at Donaldson Farms! The evening includes live music by The Emulators, five fabulous food trucks, a raffle, and tons of fun. Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of this event, has been working with the MWA in the areas of river restoration, dam removal, and engineering consulting since 2003. The MWA’s mission is to protect and improve the quality of the Musconetcong River and its Watershed, including its natural and cultural resources. They fulfill their mission through public education and awareness programs, river water quality monitoring, promotion of sustainable land management practices, and community involvement.

Get more info & Register.

August 1-3: National Stream Restoration Conference

The Resource Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing America's natural resources by restoring streams, rivers and wetlands, is hosting the first-ever National Stream Restoration Conference. The 3-day event, themed "Sharing Visions for the Future," will be held at the Gaylord Opryland Resort in Nashville Tennessee. 500 stream restoration professionals are expected to attend the conference, which includes an exhibitor hall and a wide variety of education sessions, including two which are being lead by members of the Princeton Hydro team:

Get more info & Register.

August 5: 7th Annual Adirondack Lakes Alliance Symposium

The Adirondack Lakes Alliance represents lake and river associations within Adirondack Park and is dedicated to the protection and preservation of Adirondack waters. This 6M-acre region, the largest publicly protected area within the contiguous United States, includes 3k+ lakes, rivers, ponds and streams. The Alliance welcomes you to its 2022 Symposium, which is titled, “New Challenges, New Approaches." Princeton Hydro's Chris Mikolajczyk, CLM, Senior Project Manager, Aquatics, is presenting at the symposium. Get more info & Register.

August 9: The Wild World of Watersheds

Our Senior Project Manager of Aquatics Chris Mikolajczyk, CLM will be at the Starsmore Discovery Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado talking about the wild world of watersheds! Discover what makes up a healthy watershed, why water quality is important, and explore the North Cheyenne Cañon Creek for evidence of watershed health! This free program runs from 8-9pm is an adult-focused presentation. The program will take place both indoors and outdoors along North Cheyenne Cañon Creek. RSVP to Starsmore.Staff@ColoradoSprings.gov Get more info & Register.

August 12: Columbia/Greene Regional Lakes Coalition Meeting

Join NYSFOLA for its annual Columbia/Greene regional meeting at the Sleepy Hollow Lake Lodge in Athens, New York. NYSFOLA Board members Terri Mayhew and Laurel Wolfe are putting together an full day of educational and engaging workshops and panel discussions, including a presentation from Princeton Hydro Staff Scientist Jesse Smith titled, "CSLAP and customized monitoring: How additional data is helping Sleepy Hollow Lake." The day will also include lunch and boat rides on the lake. Get more info & Register.

August 24: The Fountain Creek Brewshed Alliance - Water Quality & HABs Workshop

Princeton Hydro Senior Project Manager Chris Mikolajczyk is leading a water quality and watershed management workshop in Fountain Creek, Colorado ash Metric Brewing. His educational workshop will focus primarily on understanding and identifying HABs with an emphasis on the significant health dangers harmful algal toxins pose to humans and dogs, and what folks can do to protect themselves and their pets. The event is being coordinated by The Fountain Creek Brewshed® Alliance, which is a program of the Fountain Creek Watershed Flood Control and Greenway District. The Alliance’s goal is to engage citizens in conversations and actions that will lead to water protection and enhancement.  The group consists of water resource and craft brewing industry professionals connecting Colorado communities to the shared values of healthy watersheds and locally made beer through education and events. Get more info & stay tuned for more Colorado events.

September 17: Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference

The Northwest New Jersey partners of the four-state Delaware River Watershed Initiative presents the Fourth Annual Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference. The focus of this year’s Conference is on Tourism and promoting a compatible tourism economy that leverages the regions incredible natural resources. Princeton Hydro is proud to sponsor this event, which aims to give participants a better understanding of the relationship between our region’s water and other natural resources and our region’s quality of life, including enhanced water quality, developing a vibrant tourism sector economy, expanding recreational opportunities, and appreciating the region’s scenic values. Get more info & Register

September 21: Science Seminar Series - What’s in Our Streams and Rivers? The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

The Stroud Water Research Center presents Episode Three of its Science Seminar Series - What's in Our Streams and Rivers? The Good, the Bad, the Ugly. This free education session, sponsored by Princeton Hydro, will be offered in-person and via Zoom. The Schuylkill River will be the focus of Episode Three. Mike Hartshorne, director of ecological services at Princeton Hydro, will share the details of the yearlong Schuylkill River community science project, which was just recently completed, and share the culminating interactive ArcGIS StoryMap, which documents the ecological status and local perceptions of the river. Get more info & Register

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT:

June 18: Juneteenth Celebration Black Farmers Market

Presented by Outdoor Equity Alliance and Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space, and sponsored by Princeton Hydro, the Juneteenth Celebration Black Farmers Market, was a hugely successful event centered around the cultivation of energy and germination of ideas to help in the development of urban gardening. The OEA founded the Black Farmers Market to focus on agriculture and its importance to African American and marginalized communities. The Juneteenth celebration was held in Trenton’s Mill Hill Park, which is about 1 mile from Princeton Hydro's new headquarter office. During the event, members of the Princeton Hydro team distributed native plants that were donated by Pinelands Nursery. Get more info.

 

 
 

Stay tuned to our blog for more events!

[post_title] => Summer Events Spotlight: Workshops, Conferences & Community Events [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => summer-events-spotlight-2022 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-08-08 15:11:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-08-08 15:11:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11025 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10995 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2022-06-16 18:54:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-06-16 18:54:33 [post_content] => Time to pack up your gear and head out to your favorite fishing spot. This Saturday, July 18 is National Go Fishing Day! We’ve put together six tips to help you enjoy your angling adventures with minimal environmental impact:

1. Plan Ahead & Review Your Local Regulations.

Before you go, always do your research, educate yourself on fishing laws and regulations, and make sure your fishing license and boat registration is current. Check your local area for information on season dates, size requirements, possession limits, permit requirements, area closures, and other guidelines. These laws protect fish and other aquatic species to ensure that the joys of fishing can be shared by everyone well into the future. The New York State Department of Conservation publishes a very informative Freshwater Fishing Regulations Guide every year. Click here to review the 2022 guide.

Check out this interactive map from TakeMeFishing.org to find great fishing and boating spots in your area, including fish species you can expect to find, logged catches and fishing forecasts.


2. Wash Your Gear and Watercraft.

Reduce the spread of invasive species by thoroughly washing your gear and watercraft before and after your trip. Invasives come in many forms – plants, fungi, and animals – and even those of microscopic size can cause major damage. To learn more about invasive species, read our blog:


3. Choose the Right Bait.

Use artificial lures or bait that is native to the area you’re fishing in. Live bait that is non-native can easily introduce invasive species to water sources and cause serious damage to the surrounding environment. Always do your part to keep  our precious waterbodies clean and fisheries healthy! Opt for biodegradable fishing lures, properly dispose of your lures, make sure your lure is secure, and check your bait often. Click here for more info on eco-friendly bait and fishing gear.

[caption id="attachment_11004" align="aligncenter" width="473"] Illustration by: NYSDEC[/caption]

4. Engage in Best Practices.

Before you head out for a day of fishing, familiarize yourself with catch and release best practices. Always keep the health of the fish at the forefront of your activities by using the right gear and employing proper techniques.

NOAA Fisheries says, "Catch and release is a great conservation strategy, but simply letting a fish go does not guarantee it will live. The actions you take before, during, and after you land a fish can improve its chances of survival, keep fish stocks healthy, and keep fishermen fishing." Visit their website for more info and helpful tips.

And, check out this "Best Practices for Catch and Release" video from Keep Fish Wet, a nonprofit dedicated to promoting the use of science-based best practices to catch, handle, and release fish: [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEFnrSfKXX0[/embed]

5. Stick to the Designated Path.

Stay on designated paths to avoid disrupting sensitive and protected areas, like wetlands, shorelines, stream banks, and meadows. Disturbing and damaging these sensitive areas can jeopardize the health of the many important species living there. We recently worked with the Watershed Institute to present a workshop about stream bank restoration in communities and backyards; click below to watch.

[embed]https://youtu.be/xLLkVUp5hJM[/embed]

6. Leave No Trace.

Always, pack out your trash! Bring a bag with you to easily carry out your trash and any litter you may find. Never leave behind fishing line, fish entrails, or bait. Before a fishing trip or any outdoor adventure, familiarize yourself with the seven principles of Leave No Trace and spread the good word to others!

...

As biologists, ecologists, environmentalists, and outdoor enthusiasts, all of us at Princeton Hydro fully enjoy getting outside and having fun in nature. We also take our responsibility to care for and respect our natural surroundings very seriously. We play hard and work hard to protect our natural resources for generations to come.

By following our six tips, you’re doing your part to protect the outdoor spaces and wild places we all love to recreate in! As the old adage goes, “respect nature and it will provide you with abundance!”

Princeton Hydro has designed, permitted, and overseen solutions to reconnect migratory fish to their spawning grounds, including the installation of technical and nature-like fishways and the removal of dozens of small and large dams throughout the Northeast. To learn more, check out our blog:

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It’s River’s Month in Pennsylvania! To celebrate, the nonprofit Schuylkill River Greenways, in partnership with Berks Nature, Bartram’s Garden, The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, Stroud Water Research Center, and Princeton Hydro launched a new interactive ArcGIS StoryMap web page that reveals local perceptions of the Schuylkill River and documents the ecological status of the main stem through a year-long water quality and trash monitoring project: bit.ly/schuylkillriver. The ultimate goal of this new publicly-available resource is to connect residents and communities with the Schuylkill River and to encourage engagement with this special resource.

“For decades we have heard misgivings from residents throughout the watershed about the water quality of the Schuylkill River, and unfortunately the terrible reputation that the river had from years of polluting continues to linger. But the truth is that today the river is actually quite healthy and clean,” said Tim Fenchel, Deputy Director of Schuylkill River Greenways. “In this project we set out to work with our partners and community members to finally set the record straight with solid data about the health of the river.”

“This project brought together the conservation community and community scientists to understand the water quality and social perceptions of the Schuylkill River,” said Michael Hartshorne, Director of Aquatics at Princeton Hydro. "The results showed that the river, while having challenges as many waterbodies do, is a vibrant corridor that offers many recreational and environmental opportunities for those that live in the region.”

To understand local perceptions of the Schuylkill River’s residents, we first conducted a community opinion survey. Over 300 community members from Berks, Chester, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties participated. Overall, we found that a majority of people do care about the river (56%) and bike or walk along it (60%). However, many are not confident whether the river is clean or safe to use for recreational activity, clean enough to swim in, or safe to eat fish from. When asked about the cause of river contamination, an overwhelming majority (85%) cited "Trash and Litter" as the problem. This insight was used to drive the priorities for water quality monitoring and inspired the launch of a new Community Science trash monitoring program.

To determine the ecological status of the river, we collected water quality data for one year. Water temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and conductivity were continuously measured at four locations. Bacteria sampling for Enterococci coli (E. coli) was also conducted at each station over the course of the study.

“Protecting safe recreational access to rivers and streams is one of the most important contributions we as environmental stewards can make to local communities. This project has made great strides in supporting this cause on the Schuylkill River,” said David Bressler, Project Facilitator at Stroud Water Research Center.

To complement the water quality sampling, the team recruited “Community Scientists” to monitor and measure trash along the river by conducting 5-minute visual assessments. It aimed to document critical areas of trash accumulation or dumping points in order to guide management efforts to better deal with this pollution. Over 100 responses were logged by volunteers. Overall, the results were positive; between 73% and 90% of sites on the main stem of the Schuylkill River were rated as optimal. The participants deemed the study reach to be clean and safe for both human and aquatic life, however, there are certainly locations along the Schuylkill River that could be cleaned up.

The data collected tells the tale of a vibrant river corridor with numerous opportunities for kayaking, fishing, bird watching, hiking, and biking. The dry weather data showed water quality conditions to be ideal during the time periods most people would utilize the river. E. coli concentrations were low, and transparency is high as shown by turbidity levels. Still, the river is constrained within an environment that spans the more agriculturally rich upstream reaches down to urbanized Philadelphia. Agricultural erosion, stormwater, and suburban pollutants are a challenge upstream, while stormwater runoff, litter, and sewer overflows are a primary concern during rainfall events in the more urbanized portions of the river. During rainfall, we measured elevated E. coli, turbidity, and trash which causes poor water quality conditions. However, this should not deter those who love and enjoy the river from using it, understanding that the safest conditions are likely following periods of dry weather.

“Our coordinated monitoring effort has been a special opportunity to capture snapshots of the river from top to bottom at specific points in time. The data we collected drives home that the Schuylkill is by many measures a healthy river bouncing back from intense industrial pollution. Different issues affect different locations along its 135 miles, but we are all connected upstream and downstream!,” said Chloe Wang, River Programs Coordinator at Bartram's Garden. “In addition to our learnings about water quality, having water samples analyzed at both a professional lab and using DIY methods at our own sites helped us to understand the accuracy of the low-cost tools we can use in community science and education programs.”

Additionally, the project partners were able to put the collected data to action by submitting it to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, one of the regulatory agencies responsible for implementing the Clean Water Act for the Schuylkill. “There is so much more to learn about the river, but I hope this work helps people make informed decisions about when to get out on the water, and draws attention to opportunities to continue improving river health,” expressed Wang.

[caption id="attachment_10966" align="alignleft" width="242"] Photo courtesy of Schuylkill River Greenways.[/caption]

The water quality and trash assessment sampling protocol and interactive ArcGIS Story Map was designed by Princeton Hydro, with input from all the project partners. Detailed results and data from the perception and options survey, water quality monitoring, and trash assessment monitoring can be found on the StoryMap.

“Land and water are intrinsically connected – you can’t have healthy landscapes without healthy watersheds. Supporting this relationship is core to Berks Nature’s mission and conservation work, and through our 74-year tenure as Berks County’s land trust, we’ve seen the Schuylkill River flow cleaner and cleaner,” said Michael Griffith, Education & Watershed Specialist at Berks Nature. “We were thrilled to participate in this project not only as an opportunity to deepen our understanding of this regionally significant waterway, but also to shift public perceptions of the Schuylkill River as a community asset.”

“As we had hoped, we found that the river is indeed in great shape and we are now trying to spread the good news that all kinds of recreation on the river are safe and encouraged – including kayaking, boating, and fishing,” said Fenchel. “We have an incredible recreational and environmental asset in this river and we want everyone to know about it.”

This project was truly a team effort, with collaboration and engagement from all project partners. It was funded by the William Penn Foundation who has long been a supporter of this and similar projects throughout the Schuylkill and Delaware River Watersheds.

ABOUT SCHUYLKILL RIVER GREENWAYS: The mission of the Schuylkill River Greenways National Heritage Area is to connect residents, visitors and communities to the Schuylkill River and the Schuylkill River Trail by serving as a catalyst for civic engagement and economic development in order to foster stewardship of the watershed and its heritage.

ABOUT BARTRAM'S GARDEN: Bartram’s Garden is a 45-acre National Historic Landmark, operated by the John Bartram Association in cooperation with Philadelphia Parks and Recreation. It is a destination and an outdoor classroom, living laboratory, and membership organization for ever-expanding audiences―over 95,000 each year and counting.

ABOUT STROUD WATER RESEARCH CENTER: Stroud Water Research Center seeks to advance knowledge and stewardship of freshwater systems through global research, education, and watershed restoration. Since 1967, Stroud Water Research Center has been leading the effort to produce innovative solutions for preserving and restoring fresh water. The organization believes in an independent voice — and in adventure, inspiration, perseverance, and integrity.

ABOUT BERKS NATURE: As a nonprofit conservation organization, Berks Nature has been serving the Berks County community since 1974. Land preservation, water protection, trail management, community gardens, education programs, State of the Environment, Eco-Camp and valued partnerships are at the center of Berks Nature’s work every day.

ABOUT SCHUYLKILL CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION: Founded in 1965, the Schuylkill Center is one of the first urban environmental education centers in the country, with 340 acres of fields, forests, ponds, and streams in northwest Philadelphia. They work through four core program areas: environmental education, environmental art, land stewardship, and wildlife rehabilitation.

ABOUT PRINCETON HYDRO: Princeton Hydro is committed to improving our ecosystems, quality of life, and communities for the better. The firm was formed in 1998 with the specific mission of providing integrated ecological and engineering consulting services. Offering expertise in natural resource management, water resources engineering, geotechnical design & investigation, and regulatory compliance, their staff provide a full suite of environmental services throughout the Northeast for the public and private sectors.

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Rutgers University held a symposium focused on Improving Urban Environments. The one-day event, presented by Rutgers University’s School of Engineering and its School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, brought together government, industry, community and academic thought leaders for a high-level exchange of ideas.

The symposium included keynote addresses given by Jane Cohen, Executive Director of the NJ Governor’s Office of Climate Change & the Green Economy, and Kandyce Perry, Director of the NJDEP Office of Environmental Justice, as well as a variety of presentations and panel discussions centered around ensuring healthier and more resilient communities through technological innovation and inclusive partnerships. Presentation topics included, “Furthering Environmental Justice in New Jersey;” “Brownfields in Urban Settings;” and “Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities.”

Princeton Hydro President Geoffrey Goll, PE was recently appointed to the Rutgers University School of Engineering Industry Advisory Board. As a result of his new role, he was invited to participate as a panelist in the discussion titled, “The Role of Engineering Innovations and Government-Industry-Academe-Community Collaboration in Meeting Urban Environments Challenges.”
Photo by Denisa Moss-Heitlager.

The panel discussion also included:

  • Katrina Angarone, Associate Commissioner for Science and Policy, NJDEP
  • Christopher Obropta, Extension Specialist, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers
  • Nicole Miller, Co-Chair, Newark DIG
  • Carolina Ramos, Senior Energy Analyst, The Cadmus Group
  • Marc Tuozzolo, Acting Senior Director of Capital Planning, NJ Transit
  • Hao Wang, Associate Professor,Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rutgers
 

Geoff has a B.S. in Civil Engineering from Rutgers University (Class of 1990) and a Master of Engineering Management degree from UW–Madison.  With his primary expertise being in water resources engineering and his background in geotechnical engineering, he works in many areas of water resources, including sediment management, stream and river restoration, stormwater management and green infrastructure, freshwater wetland/coastal marsh design, dam design, and dam removal.

If you're interested in reading more about urban environment restoration, we invite you to read our blog about the South River Ecosystem Restoration and Flood Resiliency Enhancement Project. In 2018, Princeton Hydro and Rutgers University, along with the Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership, Middlesex County, Borough of Sayreville, Borough of South River, NY/NJ Baykeeper, Raritan Riverkeeper, and the Sustainable Raritan River Initiative, secured funding from NFWF’s National Coastal Resilience Fund for the project, which aims to:
  • Reduce socioeconomic damages to the Boroughs of South River and Sayreville caused by storm damage, flooding, and sea level rise;
  • Transform degraded wetlands to high-quality marsh that can reduce flooding and enhance fish & wildlife habitat; and
  • Engage stakeholders in activities about coastal resilience and ecological health to maximize public outreach in the Raritan River Watershed.
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The North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) held its 42nd Annual International Symposium from November 14–17 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Water resource professionals, researchers, students and practitioners came together to share ideas and learn about managing and protecting lakes and their watersheds.

[gallery link="none" columns="4" ids="11980,11947,11948,11981"]

This year’s conference, which was titled, “Leveraging Experience to Manage Diverse Lakes, Landscapes, and People,” featured an exhibitor hall, networking events, and a variety of presentations and workshops. Princeton Hydro, a proud contributing sponsor of the conference, led four presentations and one workshop; below, we provide a free download of each.


Princeton Hydro’s Senior Aquatic Ecologist and NALMS Board of Directors President Chris L. Mikolajczyk, CLM gave the following two presentations:

Click here to learn more and download the presentations.

Dr. Fred Lubnow, Senior Technical Director, Ecological Services for Princeton Hydro presented on “The Development of Site-Specific Harmful Algal Bloom (HABs) Management Plans.”

Click here to learn more and download the presentation.

Princeton Hydro Senior Aquatic Ecologist Paul Cooper led a presentation titled, “A 30-Year Assessment of Internal Phosphorus Loading, Nutrient Load Management, and Climate Change at Lake Hopatcong.”

Click here to learn more and download the presentation.

On the first day of the conference, Chris and Fred led a half-day workshop about developing Harmful Algal Blooms Management and Restoration Plans for Beaches and Marinas, which are designed as part of a larger, all-encompassing Watershed Implementation Plan. The workshop provided both in-lake, near-shore, and local watershed solutions to preserve water quality and protect the health of people and pets utilizing these waterbodies.

Click here to learn more and download the presentation.

A daring group of symposium participants bundled up and braved the cold temperatures for the Clean Lakes Classic 5k Run, which Princeton Hydro sponsored. The point-to-point course followed along the Mississippi River, through city greenways, and around snowy Minneapolis neighborhoods.

[gallery columns="4" ids="11943,11928,11927,11944"]

We’re also excited to announce that Chris L. Mikolajczyk won this year’s International Symposium photo contest for this stunning image he captured during a recent visit to Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado. The photo is titled “Aquatic Plant Management: No Permits Needed!”

Congratulations, Chris! . . . Founded in 1980, NALMS is dedicated to forging partnerships among citizens, scientists, and professionals to foster the management and protection of lakes and reservoirs for today and tomorrow. For more information about NALMS and upcoming events, click here. To read about upcoming events that Princeton Hydro is participating in and sponsoring, click here. [post_title] => FREE DOWNLOADS: Presentations from the North American Lake Management Society International Symposium [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => free-presentation-downloads-nalms-2022 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-12-07 22:04:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-12-07 22:04:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://princetonhydro.com/?p=11974 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 40 [max_num_pages] => 4 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => 1 [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => 1 [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => df9331abb4ace5816a06b8e8dadc5295 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [allow_query_attachment_by_filename:protected] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

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Posted on December 07, 2022

FREE DOWNLOADS: Presentations from the North American Lake Management Society International Symposium

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